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Article: Food additives and behavior in 8- to 9-year-old children in Hong Kong: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

TitleFood additives and behavior in 8- to 9-year-old children in Hong Kong: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
Authors
KeywordsADHD
Issue Date2013
Citation
Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 2013, v. 34, n. 9, p. 642-650 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To test the individual effect of artificial food colorings (AFCs) and a preservative on the behavior of the general Chinese population. Method: One hundred thirty children (70 boys and 60 girls) in Hong Kong with a mean age of 8.64 years were enlisted to the study with a within-subject crossover between AFCs, a preservative (sodium benzoate), and a placebo capsule. Two behavior scores were used including the strengths and weaknesses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and normal behavior rating scale and the child behavior checklist-teacher report form. Results: Capsule A containing AFCs and Capsule B containing sodium benzoate had no significant adverse effect compared with placebo in both behavior scores. This result persisted when analysis was restricted to children with 85% consumption of capsule (per protocol analysis). Conclusion: There seem to be no significant associations between AFCs and a preservative on Chinese children's behavior at the age of 8 to 9 years. Future directions and implications of this research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228176
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.323
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.055

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLok, Kris Y W-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Ruth S M-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Vivian W Y-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Patrick W.-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Cynthia-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Jason-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jean-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:23Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:23Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 2013, v. 34, n. 9, p. 642-650-
dc.identifier.issn0196-206X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228176-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To test the individual effect of artificial food colorings (AFCs) and a preservative on the behavior of the general Chinese population. Method: One hundred thirty children (70 boys and 60 girls) in Hong Kong with a mean age of 8.64 years were enlisted to the study with a within-subject crossover between AFCs, a preservative (sodium benzoate), and a placebo capsule. Two behavior scores were used including the strengths and weaknesses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and normal behavior rating scale and the child behavior checklist-teacher report form. Results: Capsule A containing AFCs and Capsule B containing sodium benzoate had no significant adverse effect compared with placebo in both behavior scores. This result persisted when analysis was restricted to children with 85% consumption of capsule (per protocol analysis). Conclusion: There seem to be no significant associations between AFCs and a preservative on Chinese children's behavior at the age of 8 to 9 years. Future directions and implications of this research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics-
dc.subjectADHD-
dc.titleFood additives and behavior in 8- to 9-year-old children in Hong Kong: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/DBP.0000000000000005-
dc.identifier.pmid24217026-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84892578243-
dc.identifier.hkuros229492-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage642-
dc.identifier.epage650-
dc.identifier.eissn1536-7312-

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