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Article: THE INSTITUTIONAL FOUNDATIONS OF SUPREME COURT POWER IN BRITAIN'S REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY

TitleTHE INSTITUTIONAL FOUNDATIONS OF SUPREME COURT POWER IN BRITAIN'S REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
Representation, 2013, v. 49, n. 3, p. 281-293 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Constitutional Reform Act 2005 erected an institutional 'firewall' designed to substantially insulate the courts of the United Kingdom from undue political interference. Nevertheless, the new Supreme Court, its enhanced independence in recruitment and decision-making under the Act notwithstanding, have above all insisted on maintaining a deferential stance towards parliament, leaving to the people's elected representatives the 'last word' in defining the most fundamental legal norms. This article seeks to explain this counter-intuitive phenomenon by examining certain pressures that parliament and the electorate can place on the Court, from which the Act as it currently stands has not protected it. © 2013 © 2013 McDougall Trust, London.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228170
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.363

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, Eric C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationRepresentation, 2013, v. 49, n. 3, p. 281-293-
dc.identifier.issn0034-4893-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228170-
dc.description.abstractThe Constitutional Reform Act 2005 erected an institutional 'firewall' designed to substantially insulate the courts of the United Kingdom from undue political interference. Nevertheless, the new Supreme Court, its enhanced independence in recruitment and decision-making under the Act notwithstanding, have above all insisted on maintaining a deferential stance towards parliament, leaving to the people's elected representatives the 'last word' in defining the most fundamental legal norms. This article seeks to explain this counter-intuitive phenomenon by examining certain pressures that parliament and the electorate can place on the Court, from which the Act as it currently stands has not protected it. © 2013 © 2013 McDougall Trust, London.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofRepresentation-
dc.titleTHE INSTITUTIONAL FOUNDATIONS OF SUPREME COURT POWER IN BRITAIN'S REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00344893.2013.830481-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84886429228-
dc.identifier.volume49-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage281-
dc.identifier.epage293-
dc.identifier.eissn1749-4001-

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