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Book Chapter: Early-life experiences: Enduring behavioral, neurological, and endocrinological consequences

TitleEarly-life experiences: Enduring behavioral, neurological, and endocrinological consequences
Authors
KeywordsAdolescence
Issue Date2010
Citation
Hormones, Brain and Behavior Online, 2010, p. 1975-2006 How to Cite?
AbstractThough individuals function in the present, we carry with us previous experiences that can fundamentally change how we respond physiologically and behaviorally to internal and external challenges. In this chapter, we highlight some classic and recent studies regarding how experiences neonatally and/or pubertally can influence later adult functioning. Specifically, we emphasize the role of early experience such as neonatal handling, novelty exposure, maternal deprivation, and odor-shock conditioning on immediate and long-term emotionality and cognitive abilities. As the neonatal period is not the only developmental stage when individuals are susceptible to both positive and negative influences, we also discuss how exposure to stressors during adolescence modifies later stress responsiveness and emotional behavior. Although it is clear that early-life experiences can have many enduring neurobehavioral consequences, it is important to keep in mind that much work needs to be done. Given the importance of past experiences on the future health and development of an individual, a greater appreciation and understanding of early-life experiences on enduring behavioral, neurological, and endocrinological consequences remain vital. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228169

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRomeo, R. D.-
dc.contributor.authorTang, A. C.-
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, R. M.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:22Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationHormones, Brain and Behavior Online, 2010, p. 1975-2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228169-
dc.description.abstractThough individuals function in the present, we carry with us previous experiences that can fundamentally change how we respond physiologically and behaviorally to internal and external challenges. In this chapter, we highlight some classic and recent studies regarding how experiences neonatally and/or pubertally can influence later adult functioning. Specifically, we emphasize the role of early experience such as neonatal handling, novelty exposure, maternal deprivation, and odor-shock conditioning on immediate and long-term emotionality and cognitive abilities. As the neonatal period is not the only developmental stage when individuals are susceptible to both positive and negative influences, we also discuss how exposure to stressors during adolescence modifies later stress responsiveness and emotional behavior. Although it is clear that early-life experiences can have many enduring neurobehavioral consequences, it is important to keep in mind that much work needs to be done. Given the importance of past experiences on the future health and development of an individual, a greater appreciation and understanding of early-life experiences on enduring behavioral, neurological, and endocrinological consequences remain vital. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHormones, Brain and Behavior Online-
dc.subjectAdolescence-
dc.titleEarly-life experiences: Enduring behavioral, neurological, and endocrinological consequences-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-008088783-8.00062-0-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84884787997-
dc.identifier.spage1975-
dc.identifier.epage2006-

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