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Article: Dissociation between neonatal novelty-induced preferential maternal care and enhancement in cognitive, social, and emotional functions

TitleDissociation between neonatal novelty-induced preferential maternal care and enhancement in cognitive, social, and emotional functions
Authors
KeywordsAggression
Issue Date2011
Citation
Behavioural Brain Research, 2011, v. 224, n. 2, p. 318-325 How to Cite?
AbstractEarly life stimulation is known to produce long-lasting changes in the brain and behavior. One such early stimulation method is the neonatal novelty exposure procedure which allows the isolation of the novelty effect from several prominent confounding factors inherent to the neonatal handling procedure. In two previous studies, we found long-lasting novelty effects on different sets of functional measures without accompanying preferential maternal care, even when the observation was made immediately after the novelty manipulation, a time when such preferential care is most likely to be expressed. Here, within a single cohort of Long-Evans male rats, we demonstrate that novelty exposure leads to enhancements across several functional domains, including increased disinhibition to novelty, enhanced spatial and social memory, and reduced aggression, again without the accompaniment of preferential maternal care. These findings extend novelty exposure effects to aggression and replicate previously known novelty exposure effects on spatial and social memory with extension to new developmental stages. Most importantly, these findings do not support the hypothesis that preferential maternal care towards novelty-exposed pups mediates the observed novelty effects. We discuss the possibility that the effects of neonatal novelty exposure are mediated via repeated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that serves to inoculate pups for future exposures to novelty and novelty-induced HPA activation and that maternal influence is likely to be expressed via its modulatory role-the mother sets the individual-family specific behavioral and hormonal context to allow the same early life experience to have a family-specific effect. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228123
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.002
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.533

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorReeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationBehavioural Brain Research, 2011, v. 224, n. 2, p. 318-325-
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228123-
dc.description.abstractEarly life stimulation is known to produce long-lasting changes in the brain and behavior. One such early stimulation method is the neonatal novelty exposure procedure which allows the isolation of the novelty effect from several prominent confounding factors inherent to the neonatal handling procedure. In two previous studies, we found long-lasting novelty effects on different sets of functional measures without accompanying preferential maternal care, even when the observation was made immediately after the novelty manipulation, a time when such preferential care is most likely to be expressed. Here, within a single cohort of Long-Evans male rats, we demonstrate that novelty exposure leads to enhancements across several functional domains, including increased disinhibition to novelty, enhanced spatial and social memory, and reduced aggression, again without the accompaniment of preferential maternal care. These findings extend novelty exposure effects to aggression and replicate previously known novelty exposure effects on spatial and social memory with extension to new developmental stages. Most importantly, these findings do not support the hypothesis that preferential maternal care towards novelty-exposed pups mediates the observed novelty effects. We discuss the possibility that the effects of neonatal novelty exposure are mediated via repeated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that serves to inoculate pups for future exposures to novelty and novelty-induced HPA activation and that maternal influence is likely to be expressed via its modulatory role-the mother sets the individual-family specific behavioral and hormonal context to allow the same early life experience to have a family-specific effect. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioural Brain Research-
dc.subjectAggression-
dc.titleDissociation between neonatal novelty-induced preferential maternal care and enhancement in cognitive, social, and emotional functions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2011.06.010-
dc.identifier.pmid21704655-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80051802841-
dc.identifier.volume224-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage318-
dc.identifier.epage325-
dc.identifier.eissn1872-7549-

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