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Article: Academic screencasting: Internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds

TitleAcademic screencasting: Internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology, 2011, v. 46, n. 1, p. 72-76 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey. Methods: The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations - screencasts - were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p<0.02), an association supported by qualitative data. Qualitative analysis revealed geographic isolation, busy schedules, ease of use/access, and convenience to be the key factors contributing to interest in screencasting. Conclusions: Practising ophthalmologists and residents in Ontario are interested in academic online screencasting. Rural ophthalmologists were more interested in live lectures than their urban colleagues. More research is required to assess the potential of screencasting as a CME tool.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228111
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.46
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.685

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRazik, Roshan-
dc.contributor.authorMammo, Zaid-
dc.contributor.authorGill, Harmeet S.-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Wai Ching-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:13Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationCanadian Journal of Ophthalmology, 2011, v. 46, n. 1, p. 72-76-
dc.identifier.issn0008-4182-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228111-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey. Methods: The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations - screencasts - were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p<0.02), an association supported by qualitative data. Qualitative analysis revealed geographic isolation, busy schedules, ease of use/access, and convenience to be the key factors contributing to interest in screencasting. Conclusions: Practising ophthalmologists and residents in Ontario are interested in academic online screencasting. Rural ophthalmologists were more interested in live lectures than their urban colleagues. More research is required to assess the potential of screencasting as a CME tool.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCanadian Journal of Ophthalmology-
dc.titleAcademic screencasting: Internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3129/i10-093-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79751489110-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage72-
dc.identifier.epage76-
dc.identifier.eissn1715-3360-

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