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Article: Social competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendocrine function in old age: Influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability

TitleSocial competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendocrine function in old age: Influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2008, v. 3, n. 7 How to Cite?
AbstractEarly experience is known to have a profound impact on brain and behavioral function later in life. Relatively few studies, however, have examined whether the effects of early experience remain detectable in the aging animal. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal novelty exposure, an early stimulation procedure, on late senescent rats' ability to win in social competition. During the first 3 weeks of life, half of each litter received daily 3-min exposures to a novel environment while the other half stayed in the home cage. At 24 months of age, pairs of rats competed against each other for exclusive access to chocolate rewards. We found that novelty-exposed rats won more rewards than home-staying rats, indicating that early experience exerts a life-long effect on this aspect of social dominance. Furthermore, novelty-exposed but not home-staying rats exhibited habituation of corticosterone release across repeated days of social competition testing, suggesting that early experience permanently enhances plasticity of the stress response system. Finally, we report a surprising finding that across individual rat families, greater effects of neonatal novelty exposure on stress response plasticity were found among families whose dams provided more reliable, instead of a greater total quantity of, maternal care. © 2008 Akers et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228065

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAkers, Katherine G.-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Zhen-
dc.contributor.authorDelVecchio, Dominic P.-
dc.contributor.authorReeb, Bethany C.-
dc.contributor.authorRomeo, Russell D.-
dc.contributor.authorMcEwen, Bruce S.-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:06Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:06Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2008, v. 3, n. 7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228065-
dc.description.abstractEarly experience is known to have a profound impact on brain and behavioral function later in life. Relatively few studies, however, have examined whether the effects of early experience remain detectable in the aging animal. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal novelty exposure, an early stimulation procedure, on late senescent rats' ability to win in social competition. During the first 3 weeks of life, half of each litter received daily 3-min exposures to a novel environment while the other half stayed in the home cage. At 24 months of age, pairs of rats competed against each other for exclusive access to chocolate rewards. We found that novelty-exposed rats won more rewards than home-staying rats, indicating that early experience exerts a life-long effect on this aspect of social dominance. Furthermore, novelty-exposed but not home-staying rats exhibited habituation of corticosterone release across repeated days of social competition testing, suggesting that early experience permanently enhances plasticity of the stress response system. Finally, we report a surprising finding that across individual rat families, greater effects of neonatal novelty exposure on stress response plasticity were found among families whose dams provided more reliable, instead of a greater total quantity of, maternal care. © 2008 Akers et al.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.titleSocial competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendocrine function in old age: Influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0002840-
dc.identifier.pmid18641792-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-50949083536-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-

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