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Article: Developmentally stable sex-dependent modulation of turning asymmetry by neonatal novelty exposure

TitleDevelopmentally stable sex-dependent modulation of turning asymmetry by neonatal novelty exposure
Authors
KeywordsAsymmetry
Issue Date2004
Citation
Behavioural Brain Research, 2004, v. 155, n. 2, p. 257-263 How to Cite?
AbstractIn rats, early life stimulation can enhance learning and memory and induce parallel changes in brain asymmetry. Despite persistent interest in human brain asymmetry, relatively little is known in animal models about developmental stability of early-experience effects on asymmetry and how early-experience may affect males and females differently in asymmetry measures across developmental stages. We exposed male and female neonatal rats to a novel cage for 3 min per day during the first 3 weeks of life and measured spontaneous turning behavior at juvenility (7 weeks of age) and adulthood (7 months of age). We found that (1) the effects of such neonatal novelty exposure on turning bias are developmentally stable, and (2) neonatal novelty exposure differentially modulates turning bias in males and females. We briefly discuss implications of these findings in terms of the role of brain asymmetry in modulating cognitive and emotional development. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228060
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.002
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.533

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAkers, Katherine G.-
dc.contributor.authorReeb, Bethany C.-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:05Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:05Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationBehavioural Brain Research, 2004, v. 155, n. 2, p. 257-263-
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228060-
dc.description.abstractIn rats, early life stimulation can enhance learning and memory and induce parallel changes in brain asymmetry. Despite persistent interest in human brain asymmetry, relatively little is known in animal models about developmental stability of early-experience effects on asymmetry and how early-experience may affect males and females differently in asymmetry measures across developmental stages. We exposed male and female neonatal rats to a novel cage for 3 min per day during the first 3 weeks of life and measured spontaneous turning behavior at juvenility (7 weeks of age) and adulthood (7 months of age). We found that (1) the effects of such neonatal novelty exposure on turning bias are developmentally stable, and (2) neonatal novelty exposure differentially modulates turning bias in males and females. We briefly discuss implications of these findings in terms of the role of brain asymmetry in modulating cognitive and emotional development. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioural Brain Research-
dc.subjectAsymmetry-
dc.titleDevelopmentally stable sex-dependent modulation of turning asymmetry by neonatal novelty exposure-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2004.04.024-
dc.identifier.pmid15364485-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4444249219-
dc.identifier.volume155-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage257-
dc.identifier.epage263-

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