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Article: Color visual evoked potentials in children with type 1 diabetes: Relationship to metabolic control

TitleColor visual evoked potentials in children with type 1 diabetes: Relationship to metabolic control
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 2005, v. 46, n. 11, p. 4107-4113 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE. To examine the association between metabolic control (HbA 1c) and the chromatic mechanisms of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D), by using the color visual evoked potential (VEP). METHODS. Fifty children with T1D (age range, 6-12.9 years) and 33 age-matched control subjects were tested. VEPs were recorded by placing five electrodes on the scalp according to the International 10/20 System of Electrode Placement. Active electrodes O1, O2, and Oz were placed over the visual cortex. Short-wavelength (S), and long- and medium-wavelength (LM) color stimuli consisted of vertical, photometric isoluminant (1 cyc/deg) gratings presented in a pattern onset (100 ms)- offset (400 ms) mode. Achromatic vertical gratings were presented at 3 cyc/deg. Primary outcome measure was VEP latency. The relationship between S, LM, and achromatic VEP latency, and HbA1c was determined by ANCOVA regression. RESULTS. S-, LM-, achromatic VEP latencies were not associated significantly with HbA1c. Pubertal status, however, was associated significantly (P = 0.0114) and selectively with S-VEP latency. Pubertal children with T1D had delayed (mean delay, 9.5 ms) S-VEP latencies when compared with the prepubertal children with T1D. However, there was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.1573) in the effect of pubertal status on S-VEP latency between the T1D and control groups. CONCLUSIONS. Pubertal status rather than HbA1c appears to affect selectively the S-VEP latency of preteen children with T1D. Further study is warranted to determine whether the delay in S-VEP latency in pubertal children with T1D changes over time and whether this change could be a predictive marker for future development of background diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228037
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.427
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.008

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorElia, Yesmino T.-
dc.contributor.authorDaneman, Denis-
dc.contributor.authorRovet, Joanne-
dc.contributor.authorAbdolell, Mohamed-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Wai Ching-
dc.contributor.authorTill, Christine-
dc.contributor.authorErraguntla, Vasudha-
dc.contributor.authorRubab, Shehla-
dc.contributor.authorLodha, Nidhi-
dc.contributor.authorWestall, Carol A.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:02Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:02Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 2005, v. 46, n. 11, p. 4107-4113-
dc.identifier.issn0146-0404-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228037-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE. To examine the association between metabolic control (HbA 1c) and the chromatic mechanisms of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D), by using the color visual evoked potential (VEP). METHODS. Fifty children with T1D (age range, 6-12.9 years) and 33 age-matched control subjects were tested. VEPs were recorded by placing five electrodes on the scalp according to the International 10/20 System of Electrode Placement. Active electrodes O1, O2, and Oz were placed over the visual cortex. Short-wavelength (S), and long- and medium-wavelength (LM) color stimuli consisted of vertical, photometric isoluminant (1 cyc/deg) gratings presented in a pattern onset (100 ms)- offset (400 ms) mode. Achromatic vertical gratings were presented at 3 cyc/deg. Primary outcome measure was VEP latency. The relationship between S, LM, and achromatic VEP latency, and HbA1c was determined by ANCOVA regression. RESULTS. S-, LM-, achromatic VEP latencies were not associated significantly with HbA1c. Pubertal status, however, was associated significantly (P = 0.0114) and selectively with S-VEP latency. Pubertal children with T1D had delayed (mean delay, 9.5 ms) S-VEP latencies when compared with the prepubertal children with T1D. However, there was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.1573) in the effect of pubertal status on S-VEP latency between the T1D and control groups. CONCLUSIONS. Pubertal status rather than HbA1c appears to affect selectively the S-VEP latency of preteen children with T1D. Further study is warranted to determine whether the delay in S-VEP latency in pubertal children with T1D changes over time and whether this change could be a predictive marker for future development of background diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science-
dc.titleColor visual evoked potentials in children with type 1 diabetes: Relationship to metabolic control-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/iovs.05-0178-
dc.identifier.pmid16249487-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644687069-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage4107-
dc.identifier.epage4113-

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