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Article: Modification of social memory, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and brain asymmetry by neonatal novelty exposure

TitleModification of social memory, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and brain asymmetry by neonatal novelty exposure
Authors
KeywordsAsymmetry
Issue Date2003
Citation
Journal of Neuroscience, 2003, v. 23, n. 23, p. 8254-8260 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough corticosterone (a stress hormone) is known to influence social behavior and memory processes, little has been explored concerning its modulatory role in social recognition. In rats, social recognition memory for conspecifics typically lasts < 2 hr when evaluated using a habituation paradigm. Using neonatal novelty exposure, a brief and transient early life stimulation method known to produce long-lasting changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we found that social recognition memory was prolonged to at least 24 hr during adulthood. This prolonged social memory was paralleled by a reduction in the basal blood concentration of cortico-sterone. The same neonatal stimulation also resulted in a functional asymmetry expressed as a greater right-turn preference in a novel environment. Rats that preferred to turn right showed better social recognition memory. These inter-related changes in basal blood corticosterone concentration, turning asymmetry, and social recognition memory suggest that stress hormones and brain asymmetry are likely candidates for modulating social memory. Furthermore, given that neonatal stimulation has been shown to improve learning and memory performance primarily under aversive learning situations, the neonatal novelty exposure-induced enhancement in social recognition broadens the impact of early life stimulation to include the social domain.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228022
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.924
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.105

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.contributor.authorReeb, Bethany C.-
dc.contributor.authorRomeo, Russell D.-
dc.contributor.authorMcEwen, Bruce S.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:44:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:44:59Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Neuroscience, 2003, v. 23, n. 23, p. 8254-8260-
dc.identifier.issn0270-6474-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228022-
dc.description.abstractAlthough corticosterone (a stress hormone) is known to influence social behavior and memory processes, little has been explored concerning its modulatory role in social recognition. In rats, social recognition memory for conspecifics typically lasts < 2 hr when evaluated using a habituation paradigm. Using neonatal novelty exposure, a brief and transient early life stimulation method known to produce long-lasting changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we found that social recognition memory was prolonged to at least 24 hr during adulthood. This prolonged social memory was paralleled by a reduction in the basal blood concentration of cortico-sterone. The same neonatal stimulation also resulted in a functional asymmetry expressed as a greater right-turn preference in a novel environment. Rats that preferred to turn right showed better social recognition memory. These inter-related changes in basal blood corticosterone concentration, turning asymmetry, and social recognition memory suggest that stress hormones and brain asymmetry are likely candidates for modulating social memory. Furthermore, given that neonatal stimulation has been shown to improve learning and memory performance primarily under aversive learning situations, the neonatal novelty exposure-induced enhancement in social recognition broadens the impact of early life stimulation to include the social domain.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neuroscience-
dc.subjectAsymmetry-
dc.titleModification of social memory, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and brain asymmetry by neonatal novelty exposure-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid12967987-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0141632944-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue23-
dc.identifier.spage8254-
dc.identifier.epage8260-

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