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Article: Nonuniform expression of habituation in the activity of distinct classes of neurons in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion

TitleNonuniform expression of habituation in the activity of distinct classes of neurons in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion
Authors
KeywordsAplysia
Issue Date1993
Citation
Journal of Neuroscience, 1993, v. 13, n. 9, p. 4072-4081 How to Cite?
AbstractGlobal observations of neuronal response in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion were made during habituation of the gill withdrawal reflex using voltage-sensitive dye recording. This technique makes it possible to measure the spike activity of 30-50% of the 1000 neurons present in the ganglion. Our experiments address the issue of how habituation is expressed in the activity of the population of neurons responding to siphon stimulation. Several classes of neurons exhibited characteristically distinct responses to the stimuli and to habituation training. One class of neurons (group I) responded to the onset and offset of the sensory stimulus although they are probably not primary sensory neurons. They habituate only partially when the behavioral reflex has already habituated completely. Two other classes (groups II and III) both have sustained responses to the touch, but habituate differently. Members of group III habituate completely while those in group II habituate only partially. Another class of neurons are inhibited by the stimulus (group IV). They become less inhibited after habituation. The response of both group I and group IV are new classes of response that have not been previously reported. Copyright © 1993 society for neuroscience.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227999
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.924
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.105

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFalk, Chun Xiao-
dc.contributor.authorWu, Jian Young-
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Lawrence B.-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:44:56Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:44:56Z-
dc.date.issued1993-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Neuroscience, 1993, v. 13, n. 9, p. 4072-4081-
dc.identifier.issn0270-6474-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227999-
dc.description.abstractGlobal observations of neuronal response in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion were made during habituation of the gill withdrawal reflex using voltage-sensitive dye recording. This technique makes it possible to measure the spike activity of 30-50% of the 1000 neurons present in the ganglion. Our experiments address the issue of how habituation is expressed in the activity of the population of neurons responding to siphon stimulation. Several classes of neurons exhibited characteristically distinct responses to the stimuli and to habituation training. One class of neurons (group I) responded to the onset and offset of the sensory stimulus although they are probably not primary sensory neurons. They habituate only partially when the behavioral reflex has already habituated completely. Two other classes (groups II and III) both have sustained responses to the touch, but habituate differently. Members of group III habituate completely while those in group II habituate only partially. Another class of neurons are inhibited by the stimulus (group IV). They become less inhibited after habituation. The response of both group I and group IV are new classes of response that have not been previously reported. Copyright © 1993 society for neuroscience.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neuroscience-
dc.subjectAplysia-
dc.titleNonuniform expression of habituation in the activity of distinct classes of neurons in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid8366360-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027291670-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage4072-
dc.identifier.epage4081-

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