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postgraduate thesis: Gratitude and adolescents' well-being : examining the processes and intervention effects

TitleGratitude and adolescents' well-being : examining the processes and intervention effects
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chan, W. M. [陳惠珍]. (2016). Gratitude and adolescents' well-being : examining the processes and intervention effects. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractDespite being well-documented in the literature that gratitude is positively associated with personal well-being, little is known about the psychological mechanisms involved. In addition, little is known about how to promote adolescents’ gratitude in school-based interventions. The purpose of the present project was twofold. First, to identify the possible psychological mechanisms that may explain the positive links between gratitude and well-being among adolescents. Second, to develop a school-based intervention program for adolescents and examine its effectiveness on their gratitude and well-being. To address the above aims, a correlational study (Study 1) and an experimental study (Study 2) were included in the present research project. Study 1 was a survey that explored how gratitude is associated with general health, compassion and forgiveness among adolescents. Study 2 was an intervention study that examined the effectiveness of a gratitude program on adolescents’ well-being. Both studies aimed to examine whether social connectedness and broadmindedness (which was indicated by broad attention and broad perspective) were mediators that many explain the links between gratitude and its associated psychological benefits of general health, compassion, and forgiveness. In Study 1, the participants were 176 Chinese ninth graders from a secondary school. The results indicated that gratitude was positively related to social connectedness, general health, compassion, and forgiveness. Mediation analyses showed that social connectedness was a significant mediator between gratitude and adolescents’ well-being, which included general health, compassion, and forgiveness. However, broad attention was not a mediator in the association. In Study 2, a school-based gratitude intervention program was designed to help adolescents to develop a positive attitude towards themselves, to be grateful to their family members, to members of the school, to people in the community, and to nature. The participants were 169 eighth and ninth graders from two secondary schools. They were assigned into either the gratitude condition with a five-session program on gratitude or the control condition with a five-session program on study skills. Pretest and posttest data were gathered to evaluate the effects of the gratitude program on students. The posttest data showed that participants in the gratitude condition (n = 81) reported a higher level of gratitude, social connectedness, broad perspective, general health, and compassion than their counterparts (n = 88) in the control condition. Nevertheless, paired sample t tests showed a significant increase only in gratitude, broad perspective, and general health in the experimental group. The results of mediation analyses indicated that both the changes in social connectedness and broad perspective explained the effects of gratitude intervention on general health. However, only the change in social connectedness explained the effects of gratitude intervention on compassion and forgiveness. The results have shown that compared to broadmindedness, social connectedness was more capable of explaining the positive effects of gratitude on a host of well-being indicators. The results have shown that adolescents’ well-being could be enhanced by fostering gratitude through a school-based intervention program with structured teaching activities. The results have implications for the development and implementation of school-based intervention programs that promote gratitude among students.
DegreeDoctor of Psychology
SubjectGratitude
Adolescent psychology
Well being
Dept/ProgramEducational Psychology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227900

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Wai-chan, Mandy-
dc.contributor.author陳惠珍-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-22T23:18:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-22T23:18:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationChan, W. M. [陳惠珍]. (2016). Gratitude and adolescents' well-being : examining the processes and intervention effects. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227900-
dc.description.abstractDespite being well-documented in the literature that gratitude is positively associated with personal well-being, little is known about the psychological mechanisms involved. In addition, little is known about how to promote adolescents’ gratitude in school-based interventions. The purpose of the present project was twofold. First, to identify the possible psychological mechanisms that may explain the positive links between gratitude and well-being among adolescents. Second, to develop a school-based intervention program for adolescents and examine its effectiveness on their gratitude and well-being. To address the above aims, a correlational study (Study 1) and an experimental study (Study 2) were included in the present research project. Study 1 was a survey that explored how gratitude is associated with general health, compassion and forgiveness among adolescents. Study 2 was an intervention study that examined the effectiveness of a gratitude program on adolescents’ well-being. Both studies aimed to examine whether social connectedness and broadmindedness (which was indicated by broad attention and broad perspective) were mediators that many explain the links between gratitude and its associated psychological benefits of general health, compassion, and forgiveness. In Study 1, the participants were 176 Chinese ninth graders from a secondary school. The results indicated that gratitude was positively related to social connectedness, general health, compassion, and forgiveness. Mediation analyses showed that social connectedness was a significant mediator between gratitude and adolescents’ well-being, which included general health, compassion, and forgiveness. However, broad attention was not a mediator in the association. In Study 2, a school-based gratitude intervention program was designed to help adolescents to develop a positive attitude towards themselves, to be grateful to their family members, to members of the school, to people in the community, and to nature. The participants were 169 eighth and ninth graders from two secondary schools. They were assigned into either the gratitude condition with a five-session program on gratitude or the control condition with a five-session program on study skills. Pretest and posttest data were gathered to evaluate the effects of the gratitude program on students. The posttest data showed that participants in the gratitude condition (n = 81) reported a higher level of gratitude, social connectedness, broad perspective, general health, and compassion than their counterparts (n = 88) in the control condition. Nevertheless, paired sample t tests showed a significant increase only in gratitude, broad perspective, and general health in the experimental group. The results of mediation analyses indicated that both the changes in social connectedness and broad perspective explained the effects of gratitude intervention on general health. However, only the change in social connectedness explained the effects of gratitude intervention on compassion and forgiveness. The results have shown that compared to broadmindedness, social connectedness was more capable of explaining the positive effects of gratitude on a host of well-being indicators. The results have shown that adolescents’ well-being could be enhanced by fostering gratitude through a school-based intervention program with structured teaching activities. The results have implications for the development and implementation of school-based intervention programs that promote gratitude among students.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshGratitude-
dc.subject.lcshAdolescent psychology-
dc.subject.lcshWell being-
dc.titleGratitude and adolescents' well-being : examining the processes and intervention effects-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5772746-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Psychology-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducational Psychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

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