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Article: Annexin A2 Acts as an Adhesion Molecule on the Endometrial Epithelium during Implantation in Mice

TitleAnnexin A2 Acts as an Adhesion Molecule on the Endometrial Epithelium during Implantation in Mice
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2015, v. 10 n. 10, p. e0139506 How to Cite?
AbstractTo determine the function of Annexin A2 (Axna2) in mouse embryo implantation in vivo, experimental manipulation of Axna2 activities was performed in mouse endometrial tissue in vivo and in vitro. Histological examination of endometrial tissues was performed throughout the reproduction cycle and after steroid treatment. Embryo implantation was determined after blockage of the Axna2 activities by siRNA or anti-Axna2 antibody. The expression of Axna2 immunoreactivies in the endometrial luminal epithelium changed cyclically in the estrus cycle and was upregulated by estrogen. After nidatory estrogen surge, there was a concentration of Axna2 immunoreactivities at the interface between the implanting embryo and the luminal epithelium. The phenomenon was likely to be induced by the implanting embryos as no such concentration of signal was observed in the inter-implantation sites and in pseudopregnancy. Knockdown of Axna2 by siRNA reduced attachment of mouse blastocysts onto endometrial tissues in vitro. Consistently, the number of implantation sites was significantly reduced after infusion of anti-Axna2 antibody into the uterine cavity. Steroids and embryos modulate the expression of Axna2 in the endometrial epithelium. Axna2 may function as an adhesion molecule during embryo implantation in mice.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227860
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, B-
dc.contributor.authorYe, TM-
dc.contributor.authorLee, CKF-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CN-
dc.contributor.authorPang, RTK-
dc.contributor.authorNg, EHY-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WSB-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-21T01:43:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-21T01:43:00Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2015, v. 10 n. 10, p. e0139506-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227860-
dc.description.abstractTo determine the function of Annexin A2 (Axna2) in mouse embryo implantation in vivo, experimental manipulation of Axna2 activities was performed in mouse endometrial tissue in vivo and in vitro. Histological examination of endometrial tissues was performed throughout the reproduction cycle and after steroid treatment. Embryo implantation was determined after blockage of the Axna2 activities by siRNA or anti-Axna2 antibody. The expression of Axna2 immunoreactivies in the endometrial luminal epithelium changed cyclically in the estrus cycle and was upregulated by estrogen. After nidatory estrogen surge, there was a concentration of Axna2 immunoreactivities at the interface between the implanting embryo and the luminal epithelium. The phenomenon was likely to be induced by the implanting embryos as no such concentration of signal was observed in the inter-implantation sites and in pseudopregnancy. Knockdown of Axna2 by siRNA reduced attachment of mouse blastocysts onto endometrial tissues in vitro. Consistently, the number of implantation sites was significantly reduced after infusion of anti-Axna2 antibody into the uterine cavity. Steroids and embryos modulate the expression of Axna2 in the endometrial epithelium. Axna2 may function as an adhesion molecule during embryo implantation in mice.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPlos One-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleAnnexin A2 Acts as an Adhesion Molecule on the Endometrial Epithelium during Implantation in Mice-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, CKF: ckflee@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChiu, CN: ccn0106@netvigator.com-
dc.identifier.emailPang, RTK: rtkpang@gmail.com-
dc.identifier.emailNg, EHY: nghye@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, WSB: wsbyeung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, CKF=rp00458-
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, CN=rp00424-
dc.identifier.authorityPang, RTK=rp01761-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, EHY=rp00426-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, WSB=rp00331-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0139506-
dc.identifier.pmid26444699-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spagee0139506-
dc.identifier.epagee0139506-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000362510600059-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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