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Conference Paper: Proteomic evaluation of salivary acquired pellicle on restorative material surfaces

TitleProteomic evaluation of salivary acquired pellicle on restorative material surfaces
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/
Citation
The 94th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR, 3rd Meeting of the IADR Asia Pacific Region & 35th Annual Meeting of the IADR Korean Division, Seoul, Korea, 22-25 June 2016. In Journal of Dental Research, 2016, v. 95 Spec. Iss. B, abstract no. 173 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze salivary protein adsorption behavior onto restorative material surfaces. It was hypothesized that the acquired pellicle formation is material dependent. METHODS: Dental restorative material specimen blocks were prepared of (5×5×1 mm, n=20 each) nano-hybrid resin composite, glass ionomer cements (GIC), resin-modified GIC, GIC containing casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), or human dentine. All specimen surfaces were polished with 1200-grit abrasive paper. The material surface micro morphology and surface roughness (100×100 µm2, n=10) were measured with atomic-force microscopy. After alcohol disinfection, all specimens were incubated in unstimulated, filtered, sterilized saliva for two hours at 37°C. The quantity of adsorbed protein on each material specimen was measured using a bicinchoninic acid assay. Relative acquire pellicle proteomics for each material group was characterized using liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Institutional Review Aboard approval was obtained for saliva collection. RESULTS: The surfaces of polished resin-modified GIC, GIC and GIC containing CPP-ACP exhibited a greater micro surface roughness than resin composite or human dentin (P<0.05). The quantity of protein adsorbed varied between materials, with the resin composite (5.74 µg/specimen) and resin-modified GIC (4.67 µg/specimen) adsorbing the most protein (P<0.01), no significant differences were found between dentin (2.74 µg/specimen), GIC containing CPP-ACP (2.15 µg/specimen), and GIC (1.99 µg/specimen). CONCLUSIONS: The data demonstrated that there are noteworthy variations among acquired pellicles protein quantity and in a subtle fashion quality on various material surfaces, which may affect the subsequent biofilm formation on restorative surfaces.
DescriptionOral Session - Biofunctionalization & Biological Effects of Dental Material Surfaces: no. 173
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227499
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, CX-
dc.contributor.authorBurrow, M-
dc.contributor.authorBotelho, MG-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:11:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:11:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 94th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR, 3rd Meeting of the IADR Asia Pacific Region & 35th Annual Meeting of the IADR Korean Division, Seoul, Korea, 22-25 June 2016. In Journal of Dental Research, 2016, v. 95 Spec. Iss. B, abstract no. 173-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227499-
dc.descriptionOral Session - Biofunctionalization & Biological Effects of Dental Material Surfaces: no. 173-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze salivary protein adsorption behavior onto restorative material surfaces. It was hypothesized that the acquired pellicle formation is material dependent. METHODS: Dental restorative material specimen blocks were prepared of (5×5×1 mm, n=20 each) nano-hybrid resin composite, glass ionomer cements (GIC), resin-modified GIC, GIC containing casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), or human dentine. All specimen surfaces were polished with 1200-grit abrasive paper. The material surface micro morphology and surface roughness (100×100 µm2, n=10) were measured with atomic-force microscopy. After alcohol disinfection, all specimens were incubated in unstimulated, filtered, sterilized saliva for two hours at 37°C. The quantity of adsorbed protein on each material specimen was measured using a bicinchoninic acid assay. Relative acquire pellicle proteomics for each material group was characterized using liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Institutional Review Aboard approval was obtained for saliva collection. RESULTS: The surfaces of polished resin-modified GIC, GIC and GIC containing CPP-ACP exhibited a greater micro surface roughness than resin composite or human dentin (P<0.05). The quantity of protein adsorbed varied between materials, with the resin composite (5.74 µg/specimen) and resin-modified GIC (4.67 µg/specimen) adsorbing the most protein (P<0.01), no significant differences were found between dentin (2.74 µg/specimen), GIC containing CPP-ACP (2.15 µg/specimen), and GIC (1.99 µg/specimen). CONCLUSIONS: The data demonstrated that there are noteworthy variations among acquired pellicles protein quantity and in a subtle fashion quality on various material surfaces, which may affect the subsequent biofilm formation on restorative surfaces.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Research-
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.titleProteomic evaluation of salivary acquired pellicle on restorative material surfaces-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailBotelho, MG: botelho@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK: ewkleung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBotelho, MG=rp00033-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp00019-
dc.identifier.hkuros259742-
dc.identifier.volume95-
dc.identifier.issueSpec. Iss. B-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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