File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Book Chapter: 3',5'-cIMP as potential second messenger in the vascular wall

Title3',5'-cIMP as potential second messenger in the vascular wall
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Citation
3',5'-cIMP as potential second messenger in the vascular wall. In Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology. Berlin ; New York: Springer International Publishing, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractTraditionally, only the 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphates of adenosine and guanosine (produced by adenylyl cyclase and guanylyl cyclase, respectively) are regarded as true “second messengers” in the vascular wall, despite the presence of other cyclic nucleotides in different tissues. Among these noncanonical cyclic nucleotides, inosine 3′,5′‐cyclic monophosphate (cIMP) is synthesized by soluble guanylyl cyclase in porcine coronary arteries in response to hypoxia, when the enzyme is activated by endothelium-derived nitric oxide. Its production is associated with augmentation of vascular contraction mediated by stimulation of Rho kinase. Based on these findings, cIMP appears to meet most, if not all, of the criteria required for it to be accepted as a “second messenger,” at least in the vascular wall.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227103
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.514

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SWS-
dc.contributor.authorGao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMGR-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:08:27Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:08:27Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citation3',5'-cIMP as potential second messenger in the vascular wall. In Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology. Berlin ; New York: Springer International Publishing, 2016-
dc.identifier.issn0171-2004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227103-
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, only the 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphates of adenosine and guanosine (produced by adenylyl cyclase and guanylyl cyclase, respectively) are regarded as true “second messengers” in the vascular wall, despite the presence of other cyclic nucleotides in different tissues. Among these noncanonical cyclic nucleotides, inosine 3′,5′‐cyclic monophosphate (cIMP) is synthesized by soluble guanylyl cyclase in porcine coronary arteries in response to hypoxia, when the enzyme is activated by endothelium-derived nitric oxide. Its production is associated with augmentation of vascular contraction mediated by stimulation of Rho kinase. Based on these findings, cIMP appears to meet most, if not all, of the criteria required for it to be accepted as a “second messenger,” at least in the vascular wall.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishing-
dc.relation.ispartofHandbook of Experimental Pharmacology-
dc.title3',5'-cIMP as potential second messenger in the vascular wall-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, SWS: swsleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PMGR: vanhoutt@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, SWS=rp00235-
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PMGR=rp00238-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/164_2015_39-
dc.identifier.pmid26721675-
dc.identifier.hkuros259268-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub ahead of print-
dc.publisher.placeBerlin ; New York-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats