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Article: Perceptual expertise as a shift from strategic interference to automatic holistic processing

TitlePerceptual expertise as a shift from strategic interference to automatic holistic processing
Authors
Keywordsexpertise
Issue Date2011
Citation
Current Directions in Psychological Science, 2011, v. 20, n. 2, p. 129-134 How to Cite?
AbstractHolistic processing was initially characterized as a unique hallmark of face perception but later was argued to be a marker of general perceptual expertise. More recently, evidence for holistic processing-measured by interference from task-irrelevant parts-was obtained in novices, raising questions for its usefulness as a test of expertise. Indeed, recent studies use the same task to make opposite claims: One group of researchers found more interference in novices than experts for Chinese characters, while another found more interference in experts than novices with objects. Offering a resolution to this paradox, our work on the perception of musical notation suggests that expert and novice interference effects represent two ends of a continuum: Interference is initially strategic and contextual but becomes more automatic as holistic processing develops with the acquisition of perceptual expertise. © The Author(s) 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226695
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.545
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.454

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRichler, Jennifer J.-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Yetta K.-
dc.contributor.authorGauthier, Isabel-
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T01:58:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-29T01:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Directions in Psychological Science, 2011, v. 20, n. 2, p. 129-134-
dc.identifier.issn0963-7214-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226695-
dc.description.abstractHolistic processing was initially characterized as a unique hallmark of face perception but later was argued to be a marker of general perceptual expertise. More recently, evidence for holistic processing-measured by interference from task-irrelevant parts-was obtained in novices, raising questions for its usefulness as a test of expertise. Indeed, recent studies use the same task to make opposite claims: One group of researchers found more interference in novices than experts for Chinese characters, while another found more interference in experts than novices with objects. Offering a resolution to this paradox, our work on the perception of musical notation suggests that expert and novice interference effects represent two ends of a continuum: Interference is initially strategic and contextual but becomes more automatic as holistic processing develops with the acquisition of perceptual expertise. © The Author(s) 2011.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Directions in Psychological Science-
dc.subjectexpertise-
dc.titlePerceptual expertise as a shift from strategic interference to automatic holistic processing-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0963721411402472-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960260066-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage129-
dc.identifier.epage134-
dc.identifier.eissn1467-8721-

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