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Article: Holistic processing of musical notation: Dissociating failures of selective attention in experts and novices

TitleHolistic processing of musical notation: Dissociating failures of selective attention in experts and novices
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 2010, v. 10, n. 4, p. 541-551 How to Cite?
AbstractHolistic processing (i.e., the tendency to process objects as wholes) is associated with face perception and also with expertise individuating novel objects. Surprisingly, recent work also reveals holistic effects in novice observers. It is unclear whether the same mechanisms support holistic effects in experts and in novices. In the present study, we measured holistic processing of music sequences using a selective attention task in participants who vary in music-reading expertise. We found that holistic effects were strategic in novices but were relatively automatic in experts. Correlational analyses revealed that individual holistic effects were predicted by both individual music-reading ability and neural responses for musical notation in the right fusiform face area (rFFA), but in opposite directions for experts and novices, suggesting that holistic effects in the two groups may be of different natures. To characterize expert perception, it is important not only to measure the tendency to process objects as wholes, but also to test whether this effect is dependent on task constraints. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226693
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.886
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.884

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Yetta Kwailing-
dc.contributor.authorGauthier, Isabel-
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T01:58:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-29T01:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 2010, v. 10, n. 4, p. 541-551-
dc.identifier.issn1530-7026-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226693-
dc.description.abstractHolistic processing (i.e., the tendency to process objects as wholes) is associated with face perception and also with expertise individuating novel objects. Surprisingly, recent work also reveals holistic effects in novice observers. It is unclear whether the same mechanisms support holistic effects in experts and in novices. In the present study, we measured holistic processing of music sequences using a selective attention task in participants who vary in music-reading expertise. We found that holistic effects were strategic in novices but were relatively automatic in experts. Correlational analyses revealed that individual holistic effects were predicted by both individual music-reading ability and neural responses for musical notation in the right fusiform face area (rFFA), but in opposite directions for experts and novices, suggesting that holistic effects in the two groups may be of different natures. To characterize expert perception, it is important not only to measure the tendency to process objects as wholes, but also to test whether this effect is dependent on task constraints. © 2010 The Psychonomic Society, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience-
dc.titleHolistic processing of musical notation: Dissociating failures of selective attention in experts and novices-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/CABN.10.4.541-
dc.identifier.pmid21098813-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651499659-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage541-
dc.identifier.epage551-

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