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Article: Subjective well-being amongst migrant children in China: unravelling the roles of social support and identity integration

TitleSubjective well-being amongst migrant children in China: unravelling the roles of social support and identity integration
Authors
Keywordsidentity integration
subjective well-being
social support
rural-to-urban migrant children
Issue Date2016
Citation
Child: Care, Health and Development, 2016, v. 42 n. 5, p. 750-758 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Migrant children refer to rural children who accompany one or both parents to urban area. Empirical evidence showed that compared with their urban counterparts, migrant children had poorer developmental, emotional and psychological health. Method A sample of 1306 migrant children were recruited to examine the characteristics of migrant children and investigate the effects of identity integration, support and socioeconomic factors (e.g. age, gender, type of school, family socioeconomic status, city type) on their subjective wellbeing. Results Children with higher levels of identity integration, social support, family socioeconomic status, who attended public school and who lived in the third-tiered city of Weihai demonstrated better subjective wellbeing. Social support remained a strong predictor for subjective wellbeing, despite a significant mediating effect of identity integration. Conclusions These results highlight the need for policymakers and practitioners alike to address individual factors pertaining to psychological adjustments, as well as social determinants of subjective wellbeing in the context of migration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226414
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.754
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.741

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNi, S-
dc.contributor.authorChui, CH-
dc.contributor.authorJI, X-
dc.contributor.authorJordan, LP-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-17T07:44:01Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-17T07:44:01Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationChild: Care, Health and Development, 2016, v. 42 n. 5, p. 750-758-
dc.identifier.issn0305-1862-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226414-
dc.description.abstractBackground Migrant children refer to rural children who accompany one or both parents to urban area. Empirical evidence showed that compared with their urban counterparts, migrant children had poorer developmental, emotional and psychological health. Method A sample of 1306 migrant children were recruited to examine the characteristics of migrant children and investigate the effects of identity integration, support and socioeconomic factors (e.g. age, gender, type of school, family socioeconomic status, city type) on their subjective wellbeing. Results Children with higher levels of identity integration, social support, family socioeconomic status, who attended public school and who lived in the third-tiered city of Weihai demonstrated better subjective wellbeing. Social support remained a strong predictor for subjective wellbeing, despite a significant mediating effect of identity integration. Conclusions These results highlight the need for policymakers and practitioners alike to address individual factors pertaining to psychological adjustments, as well as social determinants of subjective wellbeing in the context of migration.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofChild: Care, Health and Development-
dc.subjectidentity integration-
dc.subjectsubjective well-being-
dc.subjectsocial support-
dc.subjectrural-to-urban migrant children-
dc.titleSubjective well-being amongst migrant children in China: unravelling the roles of social support and identity integration-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChui, CH: chkchui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailJordan, LP: jordanlp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJordan, LP=rp01707-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cch.12370-
dc.identifier.pmid27349854-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84983003951-
dc.identifier.hkuros258665-
dc.identifier.hkuros260726-
dc.identifier.hkuros267037-
dc.identifier.hkuros267837-
dc.identifier.volume42-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage750-
dc.identifier.epage758-

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