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Article: Subjective well-being amongst rural migrant children in China: The role of social support and identity integration

TitleSubjective well-being amongst rural migrant children in China: The role of social support and identity integration
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
Child: Care, Health and Development (Forthcoming) How to Cite?
AbstractThe rural-to-urban migrant population in China has now reached approximately 250 million, of whom around 35 million are school-aged children. Once these children reach their destination cities, they must undergo a process of psychosocial readjustment, which at times can be challenging. Drawing from a sample of 1,307 migrant children, aged between 9 to 19 years old, this study first examined the associations amongst social support, identity integration, and subjective well-being. This was followed by a three-step regression, whereby the socio-demographics characteristics (including age, and gender), identity integration, and social support were analyzed as correlates of subjective well-being. Results show that associations amongst identity integration, social support, and subjective well-being were moderately significant (p<0.01). In particular, social support was positively associated with subjective well-being (r=0.41) and identity integration was also found to be positively correlated with both social support and subjective well-being (r=0.37; 0.23). Social support and identity integration remain strong predictors of subjective well-being after controlling for demographic measures in the regression analyses. The findings highlight the importance of social support and identity integration in supporting migrant children’s subjective well-being. Policies that incorporate components of identity integration and identity affirmation may enhance the psychological wellbeing of migrant children in China are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226414
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.754
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.741

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNi, S-
dc.contributor.authorChui, CH-
dc.contributor.authorJI, X-
dc.contributor.authorJordan, LP-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-17T07:44:01Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-17T07:44:01Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationChild: Care, Health and Development (Forthcoming)-
dc.identifier.issn0305-1862-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226414-
dc.description.abstractThe rural-to-urban migrant population in China has now reached approximately 250 million, of whom around 35 million are school-aged children. Once these children reach their destination cities, they must undergo a process of psychosocial readjustment, which at times can be challenging. Drawing from a sample of 1,307 migrant children, aged between 9 to 19 years old, this study first examined the associations amongst social support, identity integration, and subjective well-being. This was followed by a three-step regression, whereby the socio-demographics characteristics (including age, and gender), identity integration, and social support were analyzed as correlates of subjective well-being. Results show that associations amongst identity integration, social support, and subjective well-being were moderately significant (p<0.01). In particular, social support was positively associated with subjective well-being (r=0.41) and identity integration was also found to be positively correlated with both social support and subjective well-being (r=0.37; 0.23). Social support and identity integration remain strong predictors of subjective well-being after controlling for demographic measures in the regression analyses. The findings highlight the importance of social support and identity integration in supporting migrant children’s subjective well-being. Policies that incorporate components of identity integration and identity affirmation may enhance the psychological wellbeing of migrant children in China are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofChild: Care, Health and Development-
dc.titleSubjective well-being amongst rural migrant children in China: The role of social support and identity integration-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChui, CH: chkchui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailJordan, LP: jordanlp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJordan, LP=rp01707-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.identifier.hkuros258665-

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