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Article: Managing referential movement in Asian L2 writing: Implications for pedagogy

TitleManaging referential movement in Asian L2 writing: Implications for pedagogy
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
Writing & Pedagogy (Forthcoming) How to Cite?
AbstractThe introduction and tracking of discourse referents over extended discourse, known as referential movement, is a central feature of discourse coherence. However, while much attention is usually paid to the management of temporal, spatial and causal language in L2 writing course materials and curricula, it is apparent that the appropriate management of referential movement in L2 writing is often overlooked. Recent research into L2 discourse, particularly Asian L2 discourse (e.g. Kang, 2009; Crosthwaite, 2014a; Ryan, 2015, 2016) has suggested that the appropriate introduction and maintenance of reference by L2 learners is problematic - despite a universal distribution of referential form/function found in L1 discourse – with learners often under or over-explicit in their reference management, or frequently miscommunicating entirely. This has serious implications for the overall coherence of the L2 discourse produced. The proposed paper outlines four root linguistic and cognitive causes for the failure of Asian EFL students to manage reference coherently in L2 writing, then reflects on research and pedagogical approaches to improving reference management used by the author (and others). I introduce some tried-and-tested additions to L2 writing materials and in-class activities that would help improve L2 reference maintenance, including picture sequence descriptions, gap-fill tasks, silent film retellings and collaborative writing projects designed to maximise the potential of L2 writers to track reference over extended discourse sequences.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225767

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCrosthwaite, PR-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:10:47Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:10:47Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationWriting & Pedagogy (Forthcoming)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225767-
dc.description.abstractThe introduction and tracking of discourse referents over extended discourse, known as referential movement, is a central feature of discourse coherence. However, while much attention is usually paid to the management of temporal, spatial and causal language in L2 writing course materials and curricula, it is apparent that the appropriate management of referential movement in L2 writing is often overlooked. Recent research into L2 discourse, particularly Asian L2 discourse (e.g. Kang, 2009; Crosthwaite, 2014a; Ryan, 2015, 2016) has suggested that the appropriate introduction and maintenance of reference by L2 learners is problematic - despite a universal distribution of referential form/function found in L1 discourse – with learners often under or over-explicit in their reference management, or frequently miscommunicating entirely. This has serious implications for the overall coherence of the L2 discourse produced. The proposed paper outlines four root linguistic and cognitive causes for the failure of Asian EFL students to manage reference coherently in L2 writing, then reflects on research and pedagogical approaches to improving reference management used by the author (and others). I introduce some tried-and-tested additions to L2 writing materials and in-class activities that would help improve L2 reference maintenance, including picture sequence descriptions, gap-fill tasks, silent film retellings and collaborative writing projects designed to maximise the potential of L2 writers to track reference over extended discourse sequences.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofWriting & Pedagogy-
dc.titleManaging referential movement in Asian L2 writing: Implications for pedagogy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCrosthwaite, PR: drprc80@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCrosthwaite, PR=rp01961-
dc.identifier.hkuros257991-

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