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Article: Global Pattern of Nasopharyngeal Cancer: Correlation of Outcome With Access to Radiation Therapy

TitleGlobal Pattern of Nasopharyngeal Cancer: Correlation of Outcome With Access to Radiation Therapy
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijrobp
Citation
International Journal of Radiation Oncology - Biology - Physics, 2016, v. 94 n. 5, p. 1106-1112 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study aimed to estimate the treatment outcome of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) across the world and its correlation with access to radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The age-standardized mortality (ASM) and age-standardized incidence (ASI) rates of NPC from GLOBOCAN (2012) were summarized, and [1−(ASM/ASI)] was computed to give the proxy relative survival (RS). Data from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Bank were used to assess the availability of RT in surrogate terms: the number of RT equipment units and radiation oncologists per million population. Results: A total of 112 countries with complete valid data were analyzed, and the proxy RS varied widely from 0% to 83% (median, 50%). Countries were categorized into Good, Median, and Poor outcome groups on the basis of their proxy RS (<45%, 45%-55%, and >55%). Eighty percent of new cases occurred in the Poor outcome group. Univariable linear regression showed a significant correlation between outcome and the availability of RT: proxy RS increased at 3.4% (P<.001) and 1.5% (P=.001) per unit increase in RT equipment and oncologist per million population, respectively. The median number of RT equipment units per million population increased significantly from 0.5 in the Poor, to 1.5 in the Median, to 4.6 in the Good outcome groups, and the corresponding number of oncologists increased from 1.1 to 3.3 to 7.1 (P<.001). Conclusions: Nasopharyngeal cancer is a highly treatable disease, but the outcome varies widely across the world. The current study shows a significant correlation between survival and access to RT based on available surrogate indicators. However, the possible reasons for poor outcome are likely to be multifactorial and complex. Concerted international efforts are needed not only to address the fundamental requirement for adequate RT access but also to obtain more comprehensive and accurate data for research to improve cancer outcome.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225620
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.495
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.274

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, KO-
dc.contributor.authorLee, AWM-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, CW-
dc.contributor.authorSze, HCK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:09:25Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:09:25Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology - Biology - Physics, 2016, v. 94 n. 5, p. 1106-1112-
dc.identifier.issn0360-3016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225620-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study aimed to estimate the treatment outcome of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) across the world and its correlation with access to radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The age-standardized mortality (ASM) and age-standardized incidence (ASI) rates of NPC from GLOBOCAN (2012) were summarized, and [1−(ASM/ASI)] was computed to give the proxy relative survival (RS). Data from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Bank were used to assess the availability of RT in surrogate terms: the number of RT equipment units and radiation oncologists per million population. Results: A total of 112 countries with complete valid data were analyzed, and the proxy RS varied widely from 0% to 83% (median, 50%). Countries were categorized into Good, Median, and Poor outcome groups on the basis of their proxy RS (<45%, 45%-55%, and >55%). Eighty percent of new cases occurred in the Poor outcome group. Univariable linear regression showed a significant correlation between outcome and the availability of RT: proxy RS increased at 3.4% (P<.001) and 1.5% (P=.001) per unit increase in RT equipment and oncologist per million population, respectively. The median number of RT equipment units per million population increased significantly from 0.5 in the Poor, to 1.5 in the Median, to 4.6 in the Good outcome groups, and the corresponding number of oncologists increased from 1.1 to 3.3 to 7.1 (P<.001). Conclusions: Nasopharyngeal cancer is a highly treatable disease, but the outcome varies widely across the world. The current study shows a significant correlation between survival and access to RT based on available surrogate indicators. However, the possible reasons for poor outcome are likely to be multifactorial and complex. Concerted international efforts are needed not only to address the fundamental requirement for adequate RT access but also to obtain more comprehensive and accurate data for research to improve cancer outcome.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijrobp-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology - Biology - Physics-
dc.rights© 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleGlobal Pattern of Nasopharyngeal Cancer: Correlation of Outcome With Access to Radiation Therapy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KO: lamkaon@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, AWM: awmlee@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChoi, CW: hcchoi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSze, HCK: henrysze@graduate.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KO=rp01501-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AWM=rp02056-
dc.identifier.authoritySze, HCK=rp01697-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.11.047-
dc.identifier.pmid27026314-
dc.identifier.hkuros258001-
dc.identifier.volume94-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1106-
dc.identifier.epage1112-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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