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Article: Conrad and the Immigrant: The Drama of Hospitality

TitleConrad and the Immigrant: The Drama of Hospitality
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://res.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
The Review of English Studies, 2016, v. 67, p. 334-348 How to Cite?
AbstractOriginally entitled ‘The Castaway’, Joseph Conrad’s tale ‘Amy Foster’ (1901) tells the story of a Polish man who, after leaving his home to sail the seas, comes to reside, work, and raise a family in the county of Kent in south-east England. In this respect it corresponds unusually closely to its author’s own post-maritime history, though the story’s main protagonist, an illiterate peasant from the Carpathian mountains, is very unlike Conrad. Influentially, Edward Said read ‘Amy Foster’ as a great statement on the theme of exile, personally and historically important to Conrad, as to Said himself. This paper approaches the tale as a study of immigration and the reception of the immigrant (a critical issue in many parts of the world today), and discusses its staging of the drama of hospitality, and of what Derrida called ‘hostipitality’, attending to different forms of hospitality, and inhospitability, in the tale. Moving from the content of the story to its narrative rhetoric in the context of practices of Victorian and modernist fiction, the paper goes on to explore what this tale may show of the kind of qualified hospitality that modern fiction such as Conrad’s offers to the characters who come to reside in it.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225600

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKerr, DWF-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:09:14Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:09:14Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe Review of English Studies, 2016, v. 67, p. 334-348-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225600-
dc.description.abstractOriginally entitled ‘The Castaway’, Joseph Conrad’s tale ‘Amy Foster’ (1901) tells the story of a Polish man who, after leaving his home to sail the seas, comes to reside, work, and raise a family in the county of Kent in south-east England. In this respect it corresponds unusually closely to its author’s own post-maritime history, though the story’s main protagonist, an illiterate peasant from the Carpathian mountains, is very unlike Conrad. Influentially, Edward Said read ‘Amy Foster’ as a great statement on the theme of exile, personally and historically important to Conrad, as to Said himself. This paper approaches the tale as a study of immigration and the reception of the immigrant (a critical issue in many parts of the world today), and discusses its staging of the drama of hospitality, and of what Derrida called ‘hostipitality’, attending to different forms of hospitality, and inhospitability, in the tale. Moving from the content of the story to its narrative rhetoric in the context of practices of Victorian and modernist fiction, the paper goes on to explore what this tale may show of the kind of qualified hospitality that modern fiction such as Conrad’s offers to the characters who come to reside in it.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://res.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Review of English Studies-
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [The Review of English Studies] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [The Review of English Studies, 2016, v. 67 n. 279, p. 334-348] is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/res/hgw015-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleConrad and the Immigrant: The Drama of Hospitality-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKerr, DWF: kerrdw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKerr, DWF=rp01163-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/res/hgw015-
dc.identifier.hkuros258079-
dc.identifier.volume67-
dc.identifier.spage334-
dc.identifier.epage348-

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