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Book Chapter: Literacy Studies

TitleLiteracy Studies
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherRoutledge
Citation
Literacy Studies. In Karen Tusting (Eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Ethnography. UK: Routledge How to Cite?
AbstractThe territories, methodologies and concerns of Literacy Studies share considerable overlap with Linguistic Ethnography as a field. Unlike Linguistic Anthropology which originally distinguished itself through orientation to spoken language above all, much work in Linguistic Ethnography has drawn upon Literacy Studies since its foundation. In an era when the extent to which contemporary societies are permeated with online activities can only develop further, this chapter argues that Literacy Studies is of increasing relevance. Literacy Studies originated in a sociocultural orientation that considers texts of all kinds as produced in the course of social action. Notions of agency, identity, criticality and social relations are key. Inherent to methodological approaches is a concept of context in dynamic relation with specific activities in the course of which texts are produced, shared and interpreted. The ethnographic orientation of Literacy Studies entails exploration of social relationships, text histories and trajectories as well as reflexive considerations of the role of the researcher. Methods are continuing to adapt appropriately to new practices, especially in the context of new media. This chapter introduces key works and concepts in Literacy Studies, locating lessons for contemporary research in historical studies of continuing influence as well as more recent work. Puzzling terminological issues such as distinctions between Literacy Studies, New Literacy Studies and New Literacies are briefly outlined, as well a recognition of both how widely literacy is used as a metaphor, and how it is challenged in an era of increasing attention to multimodalities. Key current issues and debates are described, including the extent to which Literacy Studies acts as a challenge to many hegemonic discourses of education.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224922

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGillen, J-
dc.contributor.authorHo, SY-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-18T03:34:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-18T03:34:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationLiteracy Studies. In Karen Tusting (Eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Ethnography. UK: Routledge-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224922-
dc.description.abstractThe territories, methodologies and concerns of Literacy Studies share considerable overlap with Linguistic Ethnography as a field. Unlike Linguistic Anthropology which originally distinguished itself through orientation to spoken language above all, much work in Linguistic Ethnography has drawn upon Literacy Studies since its foundation. In an era when the extent to which contemporary societies are permeated with online activities can only develop further, this chapter argues that Literacy Studies is of increasing relevance. Literacy Studies originated in a sociocultural orientation that considers texts of all kinds as produced in the course of social action. Notions of agency, identity, criticality and social relations are key. Inherent to methodological approaches is a concept of context in dynamic relation with specific activities in the course of which texts are produced, shared and interpreted. The ethnographic orientation of Literacy Studies entails exploration of social relationships, text histories and trajectories as well as reflexive considerations of the role of the researcher. Methods are continuing to adapt appropriately to new practices, especially in the context of new media. This chapter introduces key works and concepts in Literacy Studies, locating lessons for contemporary research in historical studies of continuing influence as well as more recent work. Puzzling terminological issues such as distinctions between Literacy Studies, New Literacy Studies and New Literacies are briefly outlined, as well a recognition of both how widely literacy is used as a metaphor, and how it is challenged in an era of increasing attention to multimodalities. Key current issues and debates are described, including the extent to which Literacy Studies acts as a challenge to many hegemonic discourses of education.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Ethnography-
dc.titleLiteracy Studies-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: winhohku@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.hkuros257497-
dc.publisher.placeUK-

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