File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Subgingival/Submucosal microbiota in subjects with healthy and inflamed peri-implant tissues

TitleSubgingival/Submucosal microbiota in subjects with healthy and inflamed peri-implant tissues
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/
Citation
The 92nd General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR 2014), Capetown, South Africa, 25-28 June 2014. In Journal of Dental Research, 2014, v. 93 Spec. Iss. B, abstract no. 629 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To compare the prevalence and levels of putative ‘periodontal pathogens’ present in the subgingival/submucosal microbiota surrounding teeth or implants in subjects with differing periodontal/peri-implant health statuses. Method: 22 subjects were included in the study. Within each subject, 4 sites were selected for sampling: (1) healthy implant, (2) diseased implant [PPD≥5mm, presence of bleeding on probing (BOP) and radiographic bone loss], (3) healthy tooth and (4) periodontally-diseased tooth (presence of BOP, PPD≥4mm). Subgingival/submucosal plaque was sampled using paper points. After DNA extraction, quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR) was used to detect and quantify six bacterial species: Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The absolute counts were log10-transformed before statistical analysis. Result: The most commonly-detected species were F. nucleatum (n=85 sites), T. denticola (n=84 sites) and S. aureus (n=82 sites); while P. gingivalis had the lowest detection frequency (n=61 sites). The detection frequencies of target species was generally higher in diseased compared to healthy sites with no statistically significant differences for any particular species (p>0.05, Cochran's Q test). Regarding bacterial loads, no significant differences were found among groups except for F. nucleatum (p=0.023, Friedman 2-way ANOVA). Subgingival/submucosal plaque from diseased teeth harbored significantly more F. nucleatum than healthy implants. Both periodontal and peri-implant sites, independent of health status, were found to harbor S.aureus. The loads (log10) of S.aureus were ca. 3.5 for all the 4 groups (p=0.232), which was the highest of all the species detected. Conclusion: Our results indicate that putative periodontal pathogens are common to both periodontal and peri-implant sites independent of the health status, which may explain the high risk of peri-implantitis in patients with untreated periodontal diseases. S. aureus is commonly present in the subgingival/submucosal microbiota surrounding both teeth and implants. Abstract Disclosures: This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: the Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz, Switzerland and the Swiss Society of Odontostomatology (SSO)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224913
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhuang, LF-
dc.contributor.authorLang, NP-
dc.contributor.authorMattheos, N-
dc.contributor.authorLai, HC-
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-18T03:33:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-18T03:33:59Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 92nd General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR 2014), Capetown, South Africa, 25-28 June 2014. In Journal of Dental Research, 2014, v. 93 Spec. Iss. B, abstract no. 629-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224913-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To compare the prevalence and levels of putative ‘periodontal pathogens’ present in the subgingival/submucosal microbiota surrounding teeth or implants in subjects with differing periodontal/peri-implant health statuses. Method: 22 subjects were included in the study. Within each subject, 4 sites were selected for sampling: (1) healthy implant, (2) diseased implant [PPD≥5mm, presence of bleeding on probing (BOP) and radiographic bone loss], (3) healthy tooth and (4) periodontally-diseased tooth (presence of BOP, PPD≥4mm). Subgingival/submucosal plaque was sampled using paper points. After DNA extraction, quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR) was used to detect and quantify six bacterial species: Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The absolute counts were log10-transformed before statistical analysis. Result: The most commonly-detected species were F. nucleatum (n=85 sites), T. denticola (n=84 sites) and S. aureus (n=82 sites); while P. gingivalis had the lowest detection frequency (n=61 sites). The detection frequencies of target species was generally higher in diseased compared to healthy sites with no statistically significant differences for any particular species (p>0.05, Cochran's Q test). Regarding bacterial loads, no significant differences were found among groups except for F. nucleatum (p=0.023, Friedman 2-way ANOVA). Subgingival/submucosal plaque from diseased teeth harbored significantly more F. nucleatum than healthy implants. Both periodontal and peri-implant sites, independent of health status, were found to harbor S.aureus. The loads (log10) of S.aureus were ca. 3.5 for all the 4 groups (p=0.232), which was the highest of all the species detected. Conclusion: Our results indicate that putative periodontal pathogens are common to both periodontal and peri-implant sites independent of the health status, which may explain the high risk of peri-implantitis in patients with untreated periodontal diseases. S. aureus is commonly present in the subgingival/submucosal microbiota surrounding both teeth and implants. Abstract Disclosures: This abstract is based on research that was funded entirely or partially by an outside source: the Clinical Research Foundation (CRF) for the Promotion of Oral Health, Brienz, Switzerland and the Swiss Society of Odontostomatology (SSO)-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Research-
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.titleSubgingival/Submucosal microbiota in subjects with healthy and inflamed peri-implant tissues-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP: nplang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMattheos, N: mattheos@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWatt, RM: rmwatt@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031-
dc.identifier.authorityMattheos, N=rp01662-
dc.identifier.authorityWatt, RM=rp00043-
dc.identifier.hkuros257449-
dc.identifier.volume93-
dc.identifier.issueSpec. Iss. B-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats