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Article: Fandom and Coercive Empowerment: The commissioned production of Chinese online literature

TitleFandom and Coercive Empowerment: The commissioned production of Chinese online literature
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
Media, Culture & Society, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines how the relationship between consumers and producers of cultural products is shaped by the proprietary nature of digital platforms. Drawing on 4 years of online observation and analysis, we examine the relationship between the producers of online Chinese fiction, amateur writers, and their consumers, that is, the fan communities of readers who respond to their work. Enabled by Chinese literary websites, readers act like sponsors who provide emotional and financial incentives for writers to produce online fictions by commenting, voting, and sending money. Readers become actively involved not just because of the content of the stories but because they form strong commitments to stories and their writers, and gain reciprocity and a sense of self-determination during the interactional process. We argue that although writers are freer from state control online, they are still beholden to the whims of their fans because of what we call the commissioned production of fictions. We contribute to fan community studies by analyzing how commercialized website settings structure the strategies available to participants, how these settings affect the content of the cultural products, and how the Chinese historical and cultural contexts impact the dynamics of the online community.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224831

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTian, X-
dc.contributor.authorAdorjan, MC-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-18T03:33:14Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-18T03:33:14Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationMedia, Culture & Society, 2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224831-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines how the relationship between consumers and producers of cultural products is shaped by the proprietary nature of digital platforms. Drawing on 4 years of online observation and analysis, we examine the relationship between the producers of online Chinese fiction, amateur writers, and their consumers, that is, the fan communities of readers who respond to their work. Enabled by Chinese literary websites, readers act like sponsors who provide emotional and financial incentives for writers to produce online fictions by commenting, voting, and sending money. Readers become actively involved not just because of the content of the stories but because they form strong commitments to stories and their writers, and gain reciprocity and a sense of self-determination during the interactional process. We argue that although writers are freer from state control online, they are still beholden to the whims of their fans because of what we call the commissioned production of fictions. We contribute to fan community studies by analyzing how commercialized website settings structure the strategies available to participants, how these settings affect the content of the cultural products, and how the Chinese historical and cultural contexts impact the dynamics of the online community.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofMedia, Culture & Society-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleFandom and Coercive Empowerment: The commissioned production of Chinese online literature-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTian, X: xltian@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailAdorjan, MC: madorjan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, X=rp01543-
dc.identifier.authorityAdorjan, MC=rp00848-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0163443716646172-
dc.identifier.hkuros257547-

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