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Article: Ethical considerations in the global teaching and promotion of art therapy to non-art therapists

TitleEthical considerations in the global teaching and promotion of art therapy to non-art therapists
Authors
KeywordsEthics
Training
International art therapy
Issue Date2010
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/artspsycho
Citation
The Arts in Psychotherapy, 2010, v. 37 n. 1, p. 20-26 How to Cite?
AbstractWorking with and through art in the context of mental health has become popular and quite well known amongst social workers, community workers, nurses, artists and teachers. Many seek art therapy skills, and a greater understanding of the use of art in healing. In parts of the world where there is no professional art therapy training and no established art therapy profession, some may go on to call themselves art therapists. Despite this, art therapy is a recognized profession, with a master's level or post graduate level training and a written code of ethics. This article looks at the ethical considerations we as art therapists face in training non-art therapists. To explore this subject in greater depth we draw upon training we have delivered for social workers in Hong Kong. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224765
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.695
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.388

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKalmanowitz, D-
dc.contributor.authorPotash, JS-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-14T07:14:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-14T07:14:39Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationThe Arts in Psychotherapy, 2010, v. 37 n. 1, p. 20-26-
dc.identifier.issn0197-4556-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224765-
dc.description.abstractWorking with and through art in the context of mental health has become popular and quite well known amongst social workers, community workers, nurses, artists and teachers. Many seek art therapy skills, and a greater understanding of the use of art in healing. In parts of the world where there is no professional art therapy training and no established art therapy profession, some may go on to call themselves art therapists. Despite this, art therapy is a recognized profession, with a master's level or post graduate level training and a written code of ethics. This article looks at the ethical considerations we as art therapists face in training non-art therapists. To explore this subject in greater depth we draw upon training we have delivered for social workers in Hong Kong. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/artspsycho-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Arts in Psychotherapy-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.subjectEthics-
dc.subjectTraining-
dc.subjectInternational art therapy-
dc.titleEthical considerations in the global teaching and promotion of art therapy to non-art therapists-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKalmanowitz, D: dkalmanowitz@hotmail.com-
dc.identifier.emailPotash, JS: jordan@jordanpotash.com-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aip.2009.11.002-
dc.identifier.hkuros175494-
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage20-
dc.identifier.epage26-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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