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Article: Anger rumination: an antecedent of athlete aggression?

TitleAnger rumination: an antecedent of athlete aggression?
Authors
KeywordsRumination
Aggression
Sport
Gender
Provocation
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport
Citation
Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2004, v. 5 n. 3, p. 279-289 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anger rumination (the propensity to think almost obsessively over past experiences that have provoked negative affect in the form of anger) and athlete aggression. It was predicted that high levels of anger rumination would be associated with an increased propensity to aggress. Method. A questionnaire comprising the Anger Rumination Scale ( Sukhodolsky, Golub, & Cromwell, 2001), aggression and demographic questions was distributed to 305 male and female competitive athletes of varying ability who represented several team and individual sports. Results. Principal component factor analysis revealed a single rumination factor rather than the four-factor solution previously described. No differences in Anger Rumination Scale score were found between males and females, team and individual sport players or competitive level. Provocation and anger rumination were significantly correlated with athletes’ reported aggressive behaviour. Aggression was higher in males compared to females. Type of sport was also related to incidence of aggression; athletes who participated in individual sports reported lower levels of aggression than athletes who played team sports. Conclusions. It was concluded that provocation and anger rumination were significant predictors of subsequent aggression and suggestions for preventing rumination, such as thought stopping and thought switching, were made.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224420
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.303

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JP-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T02:51:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-05T02:51:39Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationPsychology of Sport and Exercise, 2004, v. 5 n. 3, p. 279-289-
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224420-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anger rumination (the propensity to think almost obsessively over past experiences that have provoked negative affect in the form of anger) and athlete aggression. It was predicted that high levels of anger rumination would be associated with an increased propensity to aggress. Method. A questionnaire comprising the Anger Rumination Scale ( Sukhodolsky, Golub, & Cromwell, 2001), aggression and demographic questions was distributed to 305 male and female competitive athletes of varying ability who represented several team and individual sports. Results. Principal component factor analysis revealed a single rumination factor rather than the four-factor solution previously described. No differences in Anger Rumination Scale score were found between males and females, team and individual sport players or competitive level. Provocation and anger rumination were significantly correlated with athletes’ reported aggressive behaviour. Aggression was higher in males compared to females. Type of sport was also related to incidence of aggression; athletes who participated in individual sports reported lower levels of aggression than athletes who played team sports. Conclusions. It was concluded that provocation and anger rumination were significant predictors of subsequent aggression and suggestions for preventing rumination, such as thought stopping and thought switching, were made.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Sport and Exercise-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.subjectRumination-
dc.subjectAggression-
dc.subjectSport-
dc.subjectGender-
dc.subjectProvocation-
dc.titleAnger rumination: an antecedent of athlete aggression?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMaxwell, JP: maxwellj@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1469-0292(03)00007-4-
dc.identifier.hkuros91622-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage279-
dc.identifier.epage289-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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