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Conference Paper: Conversion between hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) may impact on sleep apnea in favor of CAPD

TitleConversion between hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) may impact on sleep apnea in favor of CAPD
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/HDI
Citation
The 2nd Congress of International Society for Hemodialysis 2009: 'From Hemodialysis Unit to ICU', Hong Kong, 28-30 August 2009. In Hemodialysis International, 2009, v. 13 n. 3, p. 395 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Objective: To investigate the potential difference in impact on sleep apnea between continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and hemodialysis (HD) therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Patients and Methods: Six patients (2 males, mean age 64.3 6.8 years, 4 had diabetes, 1 had lupus, and 1 had vasculitis as cause of renal failure) underwent standard overnight polysomnography during CAPD and then HD sequentially, or vice versa. The reasons for switching from CAPD to HD were membrane failure in 1, refractory peritonitis in 3, hernia operation in 1, and perforated colon in 1. The mean ( SE) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), defined as the frequency of apnea and hypopnea per hour of sleep, during HD and CAPD was 34.1 13.0 and 7.9 3.61/hour (P=0.1), respectively. The obstructive apnea index was 13.4 7.1 vs. 7.1 2.6/hour, and the central apnea index was 20.7 13.7 vs. 0.8 0.4/hour during HD and CAPD, respectively. Five patients (83%) had reduction in AHI on switching from HD to CAPD, and this was mainly due to a reduction in the central component of sleep apnea. Conclusion: There is a trend toward reduced severity of sleep apnea associated with renal failure during CAPD compared with HD. A larger larger study cohort is needed to attest this hypothesis. Acknowledgment: Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224393
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.495
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.568

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, SCW-
dc.contributor.authorLam, B-
dc.contributor.authorYap, DY-
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSM-
dc.contributor.authorLai, KN-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-01T07:45:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-01T07:45:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Congress of International Society for Hemodialysis 2009: 'From Hemodialysis Unit to ICU', Hong Kong, 28-30 August 2009. In Hemodialysis International, 2009, v. 13 n. 3, p. 395-
dc.identifier.issn1492-7535-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224393-
dc.description.abstractStudy Objective: To investigate the potential difference in impact on sleep apnea between continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and hemodialysis (HD) therapy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Patients and Methods: Six patients (2 males, mean age 64.3 6.8 years, 4 had diabetes, 1 had lupus, and 1 had vasculitis as cause of renal failure) underwent standard overnight polysomnography during CAPD and then HD sequentially, or vice versa. The reasons for switching from CAPD to HD were membrane failure in 1, refractory peritonitis in 3, hernia operation in 1, and perforated colon in 1. The mean ( SE) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), defined as the frequency of apnea and hypopnea per hour of sleep, during HD and CAPD was 34.1 13.0 and 7.9 3.61/hour (P=0.1), respectively. The obstructive apnea index was 13.4 7.1 vs. 7.1 2.6/hour, and the central apnea index was 20.7 13.7 vs. 0.8 0.4/hour during HD and CAPD, respectively. Five patients (83%) had reduction in AHI on switching from HD to CAPD, and this was mainly due to a reduction in the central component of sleep apnea. Conclusion: There is a trend toward reduced severity of sleep apnea associated with renal failure during CAPD compared with HD. A larger larger study cohort is needed to attest this hypothesis. Acknowledgment: Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research, The University of Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/HDI-
dc.relation.ispartofHemodialysis International-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.titleConversion between hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) may impact on sleep apnea in favor of CAPD-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailTang, SCW: scwtang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, B: lambing@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLai, KN: knlai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, SCW=rp00480-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347-
dc.identifier.authorityLai, KN=rp00324-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1542-4758.2009.00402.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros180822-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage395-
dc.identifier.epage395-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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