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Conference Paper: Relationship of genetic variants in gene encoding adrenomedullin with hypertension and dysglycaemia in Hong Kong Chinese

TitleRelationship of genetic variants in gene encoding adrenomedullin with hypertension and dysglycaemia in Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcchk.com/journals.php
Citation
The 13th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Medicine, Hong Kong, 12 December 2009. In Journal of Hong Kong College of Cardiology, 2009, v. 17 n. 2, p. 64 Abstract no.P22 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Adrenomedullin (AM) is a vasodilatory peptide that acts directly via cAMP and indirectly via endothelial nitric oxide. It also facilitates the differentiation of pre-adipocytes and affects lipolysis and glucose uptake. Therefore, we investigated the association of common genetic variants in the gene encoding adrenomedullin (ADM) with hypertension and dysglycaemia in the Hong Kong Chinese population. Methods: We genotyped 4 SNPs of ADM, rs3814700, rs11042725, rs34354539 and rs4910118, in 1936 subjects from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study-2 (CRISPS-2), which has a median follow-up time of 6.4 years. Dysglycaemia includes impaired fasting glucose (≥6.1 mmol/L), impaired glucose tolerance (2h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L) and diabetes. Results: The minor T allele of SNP rs4910118 was significantly associated with lower systolic blood pressure (β=-0.057, P=0.0079) and mean arterial pressure (β=-0.054, P=0.014) at baseline after adjusting for covariates, but not at follow-up. However, none of the SNPs was significantly associated with prevalent or incident hypertension. Although dysglycaemia was not significantly associated with any of the SNPs at baseline, the minor A allele of the SNP rs11042725 was significantly associated with the development of dysglycaemia during follow-up (OR=1.30, P=0.018) and dysglycaemia at follow-up (OR=1.24, P=0.0093), after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion: Our study provides preliminary evidence for a role of the adrenomedullin gene in influencing blood pressure and the development of diabetes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224289
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.102

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOng, KL-
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWK-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, RYH-
dc.contributor.authorCherny, SS-
dc.contributor.authorSham, PC-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T07:01:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-31T07:01:34Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Medicine, Hong Kong, 12 December 2009. In Journal of Hong Kong College of Cardiology, 2009, v. 17 n. 2, p. 64 Abstract no.P22-
dc.identifier.issn1027-7811-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224289-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Adrenomedullin (AM) is a vasodilatory peptide that acts directly via cAMP and indirectly via endothelial nitric oxide. It also facilitates the differentiation of pre-adipocytes and affects lipolysis and glucose uptake. Therefore, we investigated the association of common genetic variants in the gene encoding adrenomedullin (ADM) with hypertension and dysglycaemia in the Hong Kong Chinese population. Methods: We genotyped 4 SNPs of ADM, rs3814700, rs11042725, rs34354539 and rs4910118, in 1936 subjects from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study-2 (CRISPS-2), which has a median follow-up time of 6.4 years. Dysglycaemia includes impaired fasting glucose (≥6.1 mmol/L), impaired glucose tolerance (2h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L) and diabetes. Results: The minor T allele of SNP rs4910118 was significantly associated with lower systolic blood pressure (β=-0.057, P=0.0079) and mean arterial pressure (β=-0.054, P=0.014) at baseline after adjusting for covariates, but not at follow-up. However, none of the SNPs was significantly associated with prevalent or incident hypertension. Although dysglycaemia was not significantly associated with any of the SNPs at baseline, the minor A allele of the SNP rs11042725 was significantly associated with the development of dysglycaemia during follow-up (OR=1.30, P=0.018) and dysglycaemia at follow-up (OR=1.24, P=0.0093), after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion: Our study provides preliminary evidence for a role of the adrenomedullin gene in influencing blood pressure and the development of diabetes.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcchk.com/journals.php-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Hong Kong College of Cardiology-
dc.titleRelationship of genetic variants in gene encoding adrenomedullin with hypertension and dysglycaemia in Hong Kong Chinese-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailTso, AWK: awk.tso@gmail.com-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, RYH: yhleung@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCherny, SS: cherny@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@HKUCC.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTso, AWK=rp00535-
dc.identifier.authorityCherny, SS=rp00232-
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343-
dc.identifier.hkuros178201-
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage64 Abstract no.P22-
dc.identifier.epage64 Abstract no.P22-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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