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Conference Paper: Awareness of Absence and Absence of Awareness: Failures of Sensation and Attention

TitleAwareness of Absence and Absence of Awareness: Failures of Sensation and Attention
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe Vision Society of Japan (日本視覚学会). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.visionsociety.jp/vision.html
Citation
The 6th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV 2010), Taipei, Taiwan, 23-26 July 2010. In Vision, 2010, v. 22 n. suppl., p. 33, abstract no. 21.04 How to Cite?
AbstractFailure of conscious visual perception occurs under a range of circumstances. The causes and processes leading to incidences of stimulus-blindness are poorly understood. Failure of conscious report could be, for example, a consequence of reduction of the sensory signal or lack of attentional access to sensory signals. When examining these phenomena one has the intuition that in some types of invisibility, a target is phenomenally invisible (awareness of absence), whereas in other types of manipulations, we do have a sense that we missed a target (absence of awareness). To distinguish different causes leading to a failure of visual awareness, we employed a new measure, termed subjective discriminability of invisibility (SDI) that measures whether confidences of reporting the absence of a target are different for trials in which visual awareness was impaired (miss trials) from those where no target was present (correct rejections). Targets misses were subjectively indistinguishable from physical absence when contrast reduction, backward masking and flash suppression were used. Confidence could be appropriately adjusted when dual task, attentional blink and spatial uncertainty methods were employed. These results show that failure of visual perception can be either a result of perceptual or attentional blindness depending on the circumstances under which visual awareness was impaired.
DescriptionTalk Session: Attention II
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224270
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKanai, R-
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, V-
dc.contributor.authorTseng, C-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-30T09:20:38Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-30T09:20:38Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationThe 6th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV 2010), Taipei, Taiwan, 23-26 July 2010. In Vision, 2010, v. 22 n. suppl., p. 33, abstract no. 21.04-
dc.identifier.issn0917-1142-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224270-
dc.descriptionTalk Session: Attention II-
dc.description.abstractFailure of conscious visual perception occurs under a range of circumstances. The causes and processes leading to incidences of stimulus-blindness are poorly understood. Failure of conscious report could be, for example, a consequence of reduction of the sensory signal or lack of attentional access to sensory signals. When examining these phenomena one has the intuition that in some types of invisibility, a target is phenomenally invisible (awareness of absence), whereas in other types of manipulations, we do have a sense that we missed a target (absence of awareness). To distinguish different causes leading to a failure of visual awareness, we employed a new measure, termed subjective discriminability of invisibility (SDI) that measures whether confidences of reporting the absence of a target are different for trials in which visual awareness was impaired (miss trials) from those where no target was present (correct rejections). Targets misses were subjectively indistinguishable from physical absence when contrast reduction, backward masking and flash suppression were used. Confidence could be appropriately adjusted when dual task, attentional blink and spatial uncertainty methods were employed. These results show that failure of visual perception can be either a result of perceptual or attentional blindness depending on the circumstances under which visual awareness was impaired.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe Vision Society of Japan (日本視覚学会). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.visionsociety.jp/vision.html-
dc.relation.ispartofVision = 学会誌-
dc.titleAwareness of Absence and Absence of Awareness: Failures of Sensation and Attention-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailTseng, C: ch_tseng@alumni.uci.edu-
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, C=rp00640-
dc.identifier.hkuros177453-
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.-
dc.identifier.spage33-
dc.identifier.epage33-
dc.publisher.placeJapan-

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