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Conference Paper: Two separate mechanisms in motion speed learning revealed by task difficulty manipulation

TitleTwo separate mechanisms in motion speed learning revealed by task difficulty manipulation
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com
Citation
The 32nd European Conference on Visual Perception, Regensburg, Germany, 24-28 August 2009. In Perception, 2009, v. 38 n. 1 Suppl, p. 100-101 How to Cite?
AbstractThe difficulty of a task is believed to be an important factor in determining the specificity of perceptual learning: difficult tasks usually yield more specific learning to the practiced stimulus. We reported motion sensitivity generalized across directions after practice in speed discrimination in a single direction (Tseng et al, 2007 Perception 36 Supplement, 53), in contrast to the literature revealing specific/limited motion learning. This may be due to our task being too easy, or speed learning may involve different learning mechanisms. We investigated whether we can induce similar specific learning by increasing the difficulty of our speed discrimination task by method A, replacing 50% of the single-direction signal dots with random-moving dots, or method B, by lessening speed difference between the standard and the comparison moving displays. Our results show that method A or method B alone did not generate direction-specific learning, and that easier conditions produce larger sensitivity enhancement (30%) than the more difficult conditions (19%). However, method A and B together did generate a notable M-shaped tuning curve centered at the practiced direction. Our results suggest at least two mechanisms are involved in speed discrimination learning: one increases the motion detector sensitivity and the other narrows the filter tuning by excluding external noise during speed learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224220
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.518

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChou, T-
dc.contributor.authorTseng, C-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-30T03:43:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-30T03:43:00Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationThe 32nd European Conference on Visual Perception, Regensburg, Germany, 24-28 August 2009. In Perception, 2009, v. 38 n. 1 Suppl, p. 100-101-
dc.identifier.issn0301-0066-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224220-
dc.description.abstractThe difficulty of a task is believed to be an important factor in determining the specificity of perceptual learning: difficult tasks usually yield more specific learning to the practiced stimulus. We reported motion sensitivity generalized across directions after practice in speed discrimination in a single direction (Tseng et al, 2007 Perception 36 Supplement, 53), in contrast to the literature revealing specific/limited motion learning. This may be due to our task being too easy, or speed learning may involve different learning mechanisms. We investigated whether we can induce similar specific learning by increasing the difficulty of our speed discrimination task by method A, replacing 50% of the single-direction signal dots with random-moving dots, or method B, by lessening speed difference between the standard and the comparison moving displays. Our results show that method A or method B alone did not generate direction-specific learning, and that easier conditions produce larger sensitivity enhancement (30%) than the more difficult conditions (19%). However, method A and B together did generate a notable M-shaped tuning curve centered at the practiced direction. Our results suggest at least two mechanisms are involved in speed discrimination learning: one increases the motion detector sensitivity and the other narrows the filter tuning by excluding external noise during speed learning.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com-
dc.relation.ispartofPerception-
dc.rights[Name of author(s), year]. The definitive, peer-reviewed and edited version of this article is published in [name of journal], volume, issue, pages, year, [DOI]-
dc.titleTwo separate mechanisms in motion speed learning revealed by task difficulty manipulation-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailTseng, C: ch_tseng@alumni.uci.edu-
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, C=rp00640-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/03010066090380S101-
dc.identifier.hkuros175133-
dc.identifier.volume38-
dc.identifier.issue1 Suppl-
dc.identifier.spage100-
dc.identifier.epage101-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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