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Article: But is fire the issue …? The problems of managing multiple ownership buildings in Hong Kong

TitleBut is fire the issue …? The problems of managing multiple ownership buildings in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsFire safety
Hong Kong
Legislation
Multiple ownership
Property management
Issue Date1998
PublisherInstitute of Real Estate Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.irem.org/iremstore.cfm?parentsectionid=30434
Citation
Journal of Property Management, 1998, v. 16 n. 4, p. 229-235 How to Cite?
AbstractIn common with many other cities in the world, Hong Kong has a large number of older and less well‐maintained buildings which, for predominantly economic reasons, are still highly utilised by a variety of mixed and non‐compatible uses. In these circumstances, a comprehensive approach to ensuring high standards of property management is essential, but recently a series of disastrous fires have highlighted some of the difficulties of managing property in this environment. The Government’s response to fire disasters has been to enact additional fire safety legislation. While the promotion of a safer environment in older buildings is to be applauded, it is arguable that such an approach merely addresses the symptoms ‐ the fires ‐ and not the underlying cause ‐ the management of such buildings. An examination of property management practice in Hong Kong indicates there are two important systemic factors which influence the standards and quality of services provided. The first is the way in which the property management industry is currently structured, the barriers to entry and the lack of regulation of property managers. The second is the way in which the responsibilities and relationships between owners and property managers are dictated by the method of ownership in multi‐ownership property. It is the impact that this method of ownership has on the twin issues of safety and property management which is examined in this paper.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223795
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWalters, M-
dc.contributor.authorHastings, EM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T04:15:54Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-17T04:15:54Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Property Management, 1998, v. 16 n. 4, p. 229-235-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3905-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223795-
dc.description.abstractIn common with many other cities in the world, Hong Kong has a large number of older and less well‐maintained buildings which, for predominantly economic reasons, are still highly utilised by a variety of mixed and non‐compatible uses. In these circumstances, a comprehensive approach to ensuring high standards of property management is essential, but recently a series of disastrous fires have highlighted some of the difficulties of managing property in this environment. The Government’s response to fire disasters has been to enact additional fire safety legislation. While the promotion of a safer environment in older buildings is to be applauded, it is arguable that such an approach merely addresses the symptoms ‐ the fires ‐ and not the underlying cause ‐ the management of such buildings. An examination of property management practice in Hong Kong indicates there are two important systemic factors which influence the standards and quality of services provided. The first is the way in which the property management industry is currently structured, the barriers to entry and the lack of regulation of property managers. The second is the way in which the responsibilities and relationships between owners and property managers are dictated by the method of ownership in multi‐ownership property. It is the impact that this method of ownership has on the twin issues of safety and property management which is examined in this paper.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherInstitute of Real Estate Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.irem.org/iremstore.cfm?parentsectionid=30434-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Property Management-
dc.subjectFire safety-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectLegislation-
dc.subjectMultiple ownership-
dc.subjectProperty management-
dc.titleBut is fire the issue …? The problems of managing multiple ownership buildings in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHastings, EM: hastings@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/02637479810243455-
dc.identifier.hkuros44311-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage229-
dc.identifier.epage235-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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