File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Beyond bureaucracy? Work organization in call centres

TitleBeyond bureaucracy? Work organization in call centres
Authors
KeywordsCall Centre
Work Organization
Customer Service Representatives
Bureaucracy
Information Technology
Issue Date1998
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09585192.asp
Citation
International Journal of Human Resource Management, 1998, v. 9 n. 6, p. 957-979 How to Cite?
AbstractCall centres are a rapidly growing, IT-based channel for service and sales delivery, particularly in the financial services and telecom industries. Although little research has been undertaken on the human resource aspects of call centres, two contrasting images are emerging. The first emphasizes the bureaucratic, constraining nature of these work settings, while the second image points towards worker empowerment characteristic of knowledge-intensive settings. Which of these two images more faithfully portrays the nature of work organization in call centres is the subject of our paper. Drawing on qualitative research undertaken in six call centres and a survey of front-line workers, we show that elements of both models coexist and that a hybrid model predominates. The theoretical basis for this contention, and its institutionalization as mass customized bureaucracy, lies in management's on-going attempts to reconcile two conflicting principles: standardization of processes and customization of products. The paper also explores, as key consequences of mass customized bureaucracy, front-line workers' satisfaction with various facets of their job and their overall job satisfaction, in addition to discretionary work effort. Only in relation to job security and co-worker relations could front-line workers be considered satisfied. Overall, these employees were ambivalent in their responses. They were however more likely to give more discretionary work effort than indicated by their extent of satisfaction. We conclude that, although the existing pattern of work organization may be superior to more bureaucratic forms, it is by no means ideal from the standpoint of either front-line workers or management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223708
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.262
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.705

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFrenkel, SJ-
dc.contributor.authorTam, M-
dc.contributor.authorKorczynski, M-
dc.contributor.authorShire, K-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-09T06:38:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-09T06:38:15Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Human Resource Management, 1998, v. 9 n. 6, p. 957-979-
dc.identifier.issn0958-5192-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223708-
dc.description.abstractCall centres are a rapidly growing, IT-based channel for service and sales delivery, particularly in the financial services and telecom industries. Although little research has been undertaken on the human resource aspects of call centres, two contrasting images are emerging. The first emphasizes the bureaucratic, constraining nature of these work settings, while the second image points towards worker empowerment characteristic of knowledge-intensive settings. Which of these two images more faithfully portrays the nature of work organization in call centres is the subject of our paper. Drawing on qualitative research undertaken in six call centres and a survey of front-line workers, we show that elements of both models coexist and that a hybrid model predominates. The theoretical basis for this contention, and its institutionalization as mass customized bureaucracy, lies in management's on-going attempts to reconcile two conflicting principles: standardization of processes and customization of products. The paper also explores, as key consequences of mass customized bureaucracy, front-line workers' satisfaction with various facets of their job and their overall job satisfaction, in addition to discretionary work effort. Only in relation to job security and co-worker relations could front-line workers be considered satisfied. Overall, these employees were ambivalent in their responses. They were however more likely to give more discretionary work effort than indicated by their extent of satisfaction. We conclude that, although the existing pattern of work organization may be superior to more bureaucratic forms, it is by no means ideal from the standpoint of either front-line workers or management.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09585192.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Human Resource Management-
dc.rightsPreprint: This is an Author's Original Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI]. Postprint: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI]. -
dc.subjectCall Centre-
dc.subjectWork Organization-
dc.subjectCustomer Service Representatives-
dc.subjectBureaucracy-
dc.subjectInformation Technology-
dc.titleBeyond bureaucracy? Work organization in call centres-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/095851998340694-
dc.identifier.hkuros42323-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage957-
dc.identifier.epage979-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats