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Article: Saprobic fungi on bamboo culms

TitleSaprobic fungi on bamboo culms
Authors
KeywordsBambusicolous fungi
Fungal distribution
Microfungi
Tropical fungi
Issue Date2001
PublisherFungal Diversity Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fungaldiversity.org/fdp/jumble.php
Citation
Fungal Diversity, 2001, v. 7, p. 35-48 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines the taxonomic composition of saprobic fungi on dead culms of Bambusa spp. and Dendrocalamus spp. in the Philippines and in Hong Kong. A total of 2044 collections of saprobic fungi were made, comprising 24 ascomycetes, 56 mitosporic taxa, and 1 basidiomycete. The most commonly encountered ascomycete families on both hosts and at both sites were the Xylariaceae and Valsaceae, which were represented by 20% and 21.7% of the total collections, respectively. Other common families were the Amphisphaeriaceae (8.9%) and Chaetomiaceae (11.9%). The most common hyphomycetes on both hosts at both sites were Acrodictys bambusicola (9.6%), Curvularia lunata (9%), Cladosporium cladosporioides (8.3%), Corynespora foveolata (7.9%), Ellisembia vaginata (6.1 %), Phaeoisaria philippinensis (6.5%), and Acremonium kiliense (6%). With the exception of Diplozythiella bambusina which was observed on Bambusa at both sites, the genera of coelomycetes differed at both sites. Species of Bambusa from both sites yielded more collections of saprobic fungi (1537), than did Dendrocalamus (507). Differences in the mycota between the two sites were observed. Collections of saprobes on both hosts in the Philippines were higher (1278) than in Hong Kong (766).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223466
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.991
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.027

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyde, KD-
dc.contributor.authorHo, WH-
dc.contributor.authorMckenzie, EHC-
dc.contributor.authorDalisay, T-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-29T04:08:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-29T04:08:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationFungal Diversity, 2001, v. 7, p. 35-48-
dc.identifier.issn1560-2745-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223466-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the taxonomic composition of saprobic fungi on dead culms of Bambusa spp. and Dendrocalamus spp. in the Philippines and in Hong Kong. A total of 2044 collections of saprobic fungi were made, comprising 24 ascomycetes, 56 mitosporic taxa, and 1 basidiomycete. The most commonly encountered ascomycete families on both hosts and at both sites were the Xylariaceae and Valsaceae, which were represented by 20% and 21.7% of the total collections, respectively. Other common families were the Amphisphaeriaceae (8.9%) and Chaetomiaceae (11.9%). The most common hyphomycetes on both hosts at both sites were Acrodictys bambusicola (9.6%), Curvularia lunata (9%), Cladosporium cladosporioides (8.3%), Corynespora foveolata (7.9%), Ellisembia vaginata (6.1 %), Phaeoisaria philippinensis (6.5%), and Acremonium kiliense (6%). With the exception of Diplozythiella bambusina which was observed on Bambusa at both sites, the genera of coelomycetes differed at both sites. Species of Bambusa from both sites yielded more collections of saprobic fungi (1537), than did Dendrocalamus (507). Differences in the mycota between the two sites were observed. Collections of saprobes on both hosts in the Philippines were higher (1278) than in Hong Kong (766).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherFungal Diversity Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fungaldiversity.org/fdp/jumble.php-
dc.relation.ispartofFungal Diversity-
dc.subjectBambusicolous fungi-
dc.subjectFungal distribution-
dc.subjectMicrofungi-
dc.subjectTropical fungi-
dc.titleSaprobic fungi on bamboo culms-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHyde, KD: kdhyde@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0003150001-
dc.identifier.hkuros64254-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.spage35-
dc.identifier.epage48-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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