File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Combining marine macroecology and palaeoecology in understanding biodiversity: microfossils as a model

TitleCombining marine macroecology and palaeoecology in understanding biodiversity: microfossils as a model
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1464-7931
Citation
Biological Reviews, 2017, v. 92 n. 1, p. 199-215 How to Cite?
AbstractThere is growing interest in the integration of macroecology and palaeoecology towards a better understanding of past, present, and anticipated future biodiversity dynamics. However, the empirical basis for this integration has thus far been limited. Here we review prospects for a macroecology–palaeoecology integration in biodiversity analyses with a focus on marine microfossils [i.e. small (or small parts of) organisms with high fossilization potential, such as foraminifera, ostracodes, diatoms, radiolaria, coccolithophores, dinoflagellates, and ichthyoliths]. Marine microfossils represent a useful model system for such integrative research because of their high abundance, large spatiotemporal coverage, and good taxonomic and temporal resolution. The microfossil record allows for quantitative cross-scale research designs, which help in answering fundamental questions about marine biodiversity, including the causes behind similarities in patterns of latitudinal and longitudinal variation across taxa, the degree of constancy of observed gradients over time, and the relative importance of hypothesized drivers that may explain past or present biodiversity patterns. The inclusion of a deep-time perspective based on high-resolution microfossil records may be an important step for the further maturation of macroecology. An improved integration of macroecology and palaeoecology would aid in our understanding of the balance of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the biosphere we inhabit today and affect how it may change in the future.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223306
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.725
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.469

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYasuhara, M-
dc.contributor.authorTittensor, DP-
dc.contributor.authorHillebrand, H-
dc.contributor.authorWorm, B-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-23T01:56:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-23T01:56:44Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationBiological Reviews, 2017, v. 92 n. 1, p. 199-215-
dc.identifier.issn1464-7931-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223306-
dc.description.abstractThere is growing interest in the integration of macroecology and palaeoecology towards a better understanding of past, present, and anticipated future biodiversity dynamics. However, the empirical basis for this integration has thus far been limited. Here we review prospects for a macroecology–palaeoecology integration in biodiversity analyses with a focus on marine microfossils [i.e. small (or small parts of) organisms with high fossilization potential, such as foraminifera, ostracodes, diatoms, radiolaria, coccolithophores, dinoflagellates, and ichthyoliths]. Marine microfossils represent a useful model system for such integrative research because of their high abundance, large spatiotemporal coverage, and good taxonomic and temporal resolution. The microfossil record allows for quantitative cross-scale research designs, which help in answering fundamental questions about marine biodiversity, including the causes behind similarities in patterns of latitudinal and longitudinal variation across taxa, the degree of constancy of observed gradients over time, and the relative importance of hypothesized drivers that may explain past or present biodiversity patterns. The inclusion of a deep-time perspective based on high-resolution microfossil records may be an important step for the further maturation of macroecology. An improved integration of macroecology and palaeoecology would aid in our understanding of the balance of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the biosphere we inhabit today and affect how it may change in the future.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1464-7931-
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Reviews-
dc.titleCombining marine macroecology and palaeoecology in understanding biodiversity: microfossils as a model-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYasuhara, M: yasuhara@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYasuhara, M=rp01474-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/brv.12223-
dc.identifier.hkuros257039-
dc.identifier.volume92-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage199-
dc.identifier.epage215-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats