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Article: Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT

TitleRandomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
European Radiology, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). METHODS: Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. CONCLUSION: Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. KEY POINTS: * Relaxation music does not reduce heart rate in cardiac CT * Relaxation music does not reduce beta-blocker use in cardiac CT * Relaxation music has no effect on cardiac CT image quality * Low levels of anxiety are present in patients prior to cardiac CT * Patients enjoyed the relaxation music and this results in improved patient experience.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223205

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, MY-
dc.contributor.authorKarimzad, Y-
dc.contributor.authorMenezes, RJ-
dc.contributor.authorWintersperger, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Q-
dc.contributor.authorForero, J-
dc.contributor.authorPaul, NS-
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, ET-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-23T01:55:21Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-23T01:55:21Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Radiology, 2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223205-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). METHODS: Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. CONCLUSION: Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. KEY POINTS: * Relaxation music does not reduce heart rate in cardiac CT * Relaxation music does not reduce beta-blocker use in cardiac CT * Relaxation music has no effect on cardiac CT image quality * Low levels of anxiety are present in patients prior to cardiac CT * Patients enjoyed the relaxation music and this results in improved patient experience.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Radiology-
dc.titleRandomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, MY: myng2@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, MY=rp01976-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00330-016-4215-8-
dc.identifier.hkuros256973-

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