File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Base rate of post-concussion symptoms among normal people and its neuropsychological correlates

TitleBase rate of post-concussion symptoms among normal people and its neuropsychological correlates
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://cre.sagepub.com
Citation
Clinical Rehabilitation, 2001, v. 15 n. 3, p. 266-273 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To explore the base rate of symptoms similar to those of post-concussion symptoms (PCS) among a group of participants without head injury. The effect of subjective complaints upon cognitive functioning was also examined. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 85 participants without head injury, other identifiable neurological diseases or psychiatric diseases were recruited. OUTCOME MEASURES: These included Rivermead Post-concussion Symptoms Checklist, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire, Colour Trails Test, Stroop Word-Colour Test, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, Symbol Digits Modality Test, Word Fluency Test, Design Fluency Test, Digits Forward and Backward Span Test, and Modified Six Elements Test. RESULTS: A relatively high proportion of the participants reported symptoms similar to those of patients with PCS. These included longer time to think (65.9%), forgetfulness (58.9%), poor concentration (58.9%), fatigue easily (53.5%), and sleep disturbances (50.6%). Gender effect was not significant for either the individual item or the total score of the Rivermead Post-concussion Symptoms Checklist. Moreover, there was no difference found between low symptom reporters and high symptom reporters in terms of attention, working memory, mental fluency, and strategy allocation. CONCLUSION: The base rates of symptoms were consistent with previous studies among the nonclinical groups. However, persons reporting a high score of concussion-like symptoms did not perform less well than those reporting a low score of symptoms in attention, working memory, mental fluency and strategy allocation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222904
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.403
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.149

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-12T03:53:48Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-12T03:53:48Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Rehabilitation, 2001, v. 15 n. 3, p. 266-273-
dc.identifier.issn0269-2155-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222904-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To explore the base rate of symptoms similar to those of post-concussion symptoms (PCS) among a group of participants without head injury. The effect of subjective complaints upon cognitive functioning was also examined. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 85 participants without head injury, other identifiable neurological diseases or psychiatric diseases were recruited. OUTCOME MEASURES: These included Rivermead Post-concussion Symptoms Checklist, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire, Colour Trails Test, Stroop Word-Colour Test, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, Symbol Digits Modality Test, Word Fluency Test, Design Fluency Test, Digits Forward and Backward Span Test, and Modified Six Elements Test. RESULTS: A relatively high proportion of the participants reported symptoms similar to those of patients with PCS. These included longer time to think (65.9%), forgetfulness (58.9%), poor concentration (58.9%), fatigue easily (53.5%), and sleep disturbances (50.6%). Gender effect was not significant for either the individual item or the total score of the Rivermead Post-concussion Symptoms Checklist. Moreover, there was no difference found between low symptom reporters and high symptom reporters in terms of attention, working memory, mental fluency, and strategy allocation. CONCLUSION: The base rates of symptoms were consistent with previous studies among the nonclinical groups. However, persons reporting a high score of concussion-like symptoms did not perform less well than those reporting a low score of symptoms in attention, working memory, mental fluency and strategy allocation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://cre.sagepub.com-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Rehabilitation-
dc.rightsClinical Rehabilitation. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBrain Concussion - diagnosis - psychology-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.titleBase rate of post-concussion symptoms among normal people and its neuropsychological correlates-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, RCK: ckrchan@graduate.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1191/026921501675253420-
dc.identifier.pmid11386396-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034996969-
dc.identifier.hkuros61231-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage266-
dc.identifier.epage273-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats