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Article: Biases in the perceived prevalence and motives of severe acute respiratory syndrome prevention behaviors among Chinese high school students in Hong Kong

TitleBiases in the perceived prevalence and motives of severe acute respiratory syndrome prevention behaviors among Chinese high school students in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsActor-observer bias
False consensus
Pluralistic ignorance
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
Social cognitive biases
Issue Date2004
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/AJSP
Citation
Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 2004, v. 7 n. 1, p. 67-81 How to Cite?
AbstractIn two studies conducted in Hong Kong during and immediately after the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), participants displayed several social cognitive biases when they estimated the prevalence of and inferred the motives underlying SARS preventive behaviors. First, participants who practiced preventive behaviors (practicers) consistently estimated that more people practiced such behaviors than did non-practicers (false consensus bias). Second, for some preventive behaviors, participants believed that their own behaviors were more motivated by prosocial concerns (relative to self-interest) than were other practicers (pluralistic ignorance). Finally, non-practicers underestimated the importance of prosocial concerns underlying some preventive behaviors (actor-observer bias). We discussed the relevance of these social cognitive biases to health education and to Hong Kong people's psychological reactions to SARS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222831
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.261
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.665

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTam, KP-
dc.contributor.authorLau, IYM-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CY-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-03T07:34:23Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-03T07:34:23Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationAsian Journal of Social Psychology, 2004, v. 7 n. 1, p. 67-81-
dc.identifier.issn1367-2223-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222831-
dc.description.abstractIn two studies conducted in Hong Kong during and immediately after the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), participants displayed several social cognitive biases when they estimated the prevalence of and inferred the motives underlying SARS preventive behaviors. First, participants who practiced preventive behaviors (practicers) consistently estimated that more people practiced such behaviors than did non-practicers (false consensus bias). Second, for some preventive behaviors, participants believed that their own behaviors were more motivated by prosocial concerns (relative to self-interest) than were other practicers (pluralistic ignorance). Finally, non-practicers underestimated the importance of prosocial concerns underlying some preventive behaviors (actor-observer bias). We discussed the relevance of these social cognitive biases to health education and to Hong Kong people's psychological reactions to SARS.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/AJSP-
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Journal of Social Psychology-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectActor-observer bias-
dc.subjectFalse consensus-
dc.subjectPluralistic ignorance-
dc.subjectSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-
dc.subjectSocial cognitive biases-
dc.titleBiases in the perceived prevalence and motives of severe acute respiratory syndrome prevention behaviors among Chinese high school students in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLau, IYM: ilau@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChiu, CY: cychiu@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-839X.2004.00135.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4043092262-
dc.identifier.hkuros90031-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage67-
dc.identifier.epage81-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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