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Conference Paper: Brain processing of nouns and verbs by chinese-english bilinguals

TitleBrain processing of nouns and verbs by chinese-english bilinguals
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.asp
Citation
The 28th International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39 n. 5-6, p. 387, abstract no. 4065.3 How to Cite?
AbstractA general finding in English seems to be that verbs are represented in left prefrontal region and nouns in temporal-occipital regions. Functional MRI studies with Chinese, however, have indicated that Chinese nouns and verbs activate a wide range of overlapping brain areas, without a significant difference. In this paper I will report on our recent fMRI findings that in Chinese-English bilinguals, Chinese nouns and verbs activate a common neuroanatomical circuit, whereas English nouns and verbs provoke different neural networks weighted by word category. Our findings agree with the recent proposal that language experience shapes neural systems of reading and speaking.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222780
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.276
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.552

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, LH-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-28T02:24:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-28T02:24:40Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationThe 28th International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39 n. 5-6, p. 387, abstract no. 4065.3-
dc.identifier.issn0020-7594-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222780-
dc.description.abstractA general finding in English seems to be that verbs are represented in left prefrontal region and nouns in temporal-occipital regions. Functional MRI studies with Chinese, however, have indicated that Chinese nouns and verbs activate a wide range of overlapping brain areas, without a significant difference. In this paper I will report on our recent fMRI findings that in Chinese-English bilinguals, Chinese nouns and verbs activate a common neuroanatomical circuit, whereas English nouns and verbs provoke different neural networks weighted by word category. Our findings agree with the recent proposal that language experience shapes neural systems of reading and speaking.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Psychology-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Psychology. Copyright © Psychology Press.-
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.-
dc.titleBrain processing of nouns and verbs by chinese-english bilinguals-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207594.2004.20040812-
dc.identifier.volume39-
dc.identifier.issue5-6-
dc.identifier.spage387, abstract no. 4065.3-
dc.identifier.epage387, abstract no. 4065.3-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.description.otherThe 28th International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39 n. 5-6, p. 387, abstract no. 4065.3-

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