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Article: Higher glycemic load diet is associated with poorer nutrient intake in women with gestational diabetes mellitus

TitleHigher glycemic load diet is associated with poorer nutrient intake in women with gestational diabetes mellitus
Authors
KeywordsGlycemic index
Gestational diabetes mellitus
Pregnancy
Nutrient adequacy
Glycemic load
Issue Date2013
Citation
Nutrition Research, 2013, v. 33, n. 4, p. 259-265 How to Cite?
AbstractChanges in the quality and quantity of carbohydrate foods may compromise nutrient intake in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We hypothesized that glycemic index, glycemic load (GL), carbohydrate intake, grains, and cereal product consumption would be associated with nutrient adequacy. Eighty-two women with GDM (61% of Asian background, 34% whites) completed a 3-day food record following their routine group nutrition education session. Nutrient intakes were compared to Nutrient Reference Values (NRV) for Australia and New Zealand. Nutrient intake across energy-adjusted tertiles of glycemic index, GL, carbohydrate intake, and intake of grains and cereal products were assessed. The majority of women (66%-99%) did not meet the NRV for fiber, folate, vitamin D, iodine, and iron, and exceeded NRV for saturated fat and sodium. Higher dietary GL was associated with lower intakes of total, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fat; vitamin E; and potassium (all P < .001). Higher grain intake was not significantly associated with intake of any micronutrients. In Australian women with GDM, high dietary GL predicts greater risk of poor nutrition. © 2013 Elsevier Inc..
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222658
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.171

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLouie, Jimmy Chun Yu-
dc.contributor.authorMarkovic, Tania P.-
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Glynis P.-
dc.contributor.authorFoote, Deborah-
dc.contributor.authorBrand-Miller, Jennie C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T03:36:49Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-19T03:36:49Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationNutrition Research, 2013, v. 33, n. 4, p. 259-265-
dc.identifier.issn0271-5317-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222658-
dc.description.abstractChanges in the quality and quantity of carbohydrate foods may compromise nutrient intake in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We hypothesized that glycemic index, glycemic load (GL), carbohydrate intake, grains, and cereal product consumption would be associated with nutrient adequacy. Eighty-two women with GDM (61% of Asian background, 34% whites) completed a 3-day food record following their routine group nutrition education session. Nutrient intakes were compared to Nutrient Reference Values (NRV) for Australia and New Zealand. Nutrient intake across energy-adjusted tertiles of glycemic index, GL, carbohydrate intake, and intake of grains and cereal products were assessed. The majority of women (66%-99%) did not meet the NRV for fiber, folate, vitamin D, iodine, and iron, and exceeded NRV for saturated fat and sodium. Higher dietary GL was associated with lower intakes of total, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fat; vitamin E; and potassium (all P < .001). Higher grain intake was not significantly associated with intake of any micronutrients. In Australian women with GDM, high dietary GL predicts greater risk of poor nutrition. © 2013 Elsevier Inc..-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofNutrition Research-
dc.subjectGlycemic index-
dc.subjectGestational diabetes mellitus-
dc.subjectPregnancy-
dc.subjectNutrient adequacy-
dc.subjectGlycemic load-
dc.titleHigher glycemic load diet is associated with poorer nutrient intake in women with gestational diabetes mellitus-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nutres.2013.02.008-
dc.identifier.pmid23602242-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876716369-
dc.identifier.volume33-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage259-
dc.identifier.epage265-
dc.identifier.eissn1879-0739-

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