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Article: Assessing ecological modernization in China: Stakeholder demands and corporate environmental management practices in guangdong province

TitleAssessing ecological modernization in China: Stakeholder demands and corporate environmental management practices in guangdong province
Authors
Keywordsenvironmental politics
China
ecological modernization
ecological rationality
business community
economic logic
stakeholder
Issue Date2013
Citation
China Quarterly, 2013, n. 213, p. 101-129 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper compares the key arguments of ecological modernization theory (EMT) with the reality of recent environmental reform in China. Based on data gathered from a survey and in-depth interviews with executives from Hong Kong-based enterprises operating in Guangdong province, we examine the changing roles of government, market, and civil society actors in the reform process, focusing on various types of pressures these actors have exerted on business enterprises. Compatible with Mol's (2006) conjectures, ecological concerns have gradually gained a foothold in existing political, economic, and to a lesser extent, social institutions. Yet, the relevant actors and their patterns of interactions differ from what EMT generalizes from Western European experiences. Specifically, local governments are assuming a more formalized relationship with firms in regulatory enforcement. Among market actors, organizational buyers along the supply chain have exerted more noticeable pressures on manufacturing firms than industrial associations and individual consumers. Civil society, while remaining less of an institutionalized actor in the environmental policy process, appears to pose a perceptible threat to at least some firms. © 2013 The China Quarterly.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222656
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.058

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYee, Wai Hang-
dc.contributor.authorLo, Carlos Wing Hung-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Shui Yan-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T03:36:46Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-19T03:36:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationChina Quarterly, 2013, n. 213, p. 101-129-
dc.identifier.issn0305-7410-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222656-
dc.description.abstractThis paper compares the key arguments of ecological modernization theory (EMT) with the reality of recent environmental reform in China. Based on data gathered from a survey and in-depth interviews with executives from Hong Kong-based enterprises operating in Guangdong province, we examine the changing roles of government, market, and civil society actors in the reform process, focusing on various types of pressures these actors have exerted on business enterprises. Compatible with Mol's (2006) conjectures, ecological concerns have gradually gained a foothold in existing political, economic, and to a lesser extent, social institutions. Yet, the relevant actors and their patterns of interactions differ from what EMT generalizes from Western European experiences. Specifically, local governments are assuming a more formalized relationship with firms in regulatory enforcement. Among market actors, organizational buyers along the supply chain have exerted more noticeable pressures on manufacturing firms than industrial associations and individual consumers. Civil society, while remaining less of an institutionalized actor in the environmental policy process, appears to pose a perceptible threat to at least some firms. © 2013 The China Quarterly.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofChina Quarterly-
dc.subjectenvironmental politics-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectecological modernization-
dc.subjectecological rationality-
dc.subjectbusiness community-
dc.subjecteconomic logic-
dc.subjectstakeholder-
dc.titleAssessing ecological modernization in China: Stakeholder demands and corporate environmental management practices in guangdong province-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0305741012001543-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875500839-
dc.identifier.hkuros263054-
dc.identifier.issue213-
dc.identifier.spage101-
dc.identifier.epage129-
dc.identifier.eissn1468-2648-

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