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Article: Do We Provide Meaningful Guidance for Healthful Eating? An Investigation into Consumers' Interpretation of Frequency Consumption Terms

TitleDo We Provide Meaningful Guidance for Healthful Eating? An Investigation into Consumers' Interpretation of Frequency Consumption Terms
Authors
KeywordsNutrition policy
Food labeling
Consumer health information
Issue Date2012
Citation
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 2012, v. 44, n. 5, p. 459-463 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate consumers' understanding of terms commonly used to provide guidance about frequency and quantity of food consumption. Methods: A survey of 405 shoppers explored how frequently consumers thought food labeled with the terms "eat often," "eat moderately," "eat occasionally," "a sometimes food," and "an extra food" should be eaten. In a separate phase, 30 grocery buyers responded to open-ended questions about their interpretation of these terms. Results: Responses indicated significant differences in meaning between the terms. However, the specific interpretation of each term varied considerably across respondents. The qualitative research found the terms to be highly subjective, and there was a high degree of uncertainty about the meaning of the term "an extra food" in particular. Conclusions and Implications: Food frequency and descriptive terms currently used do not provide meaningful or consistent nutritional guidance. There is a need for simple, unambiguous terminology. © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222651
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.253
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKing, Lesley-
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Wendy L.-
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Kathy-
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Bridget-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, Jimmy C Y-
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Clare-
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Jennifer-
dc.contributor.authorGill, Timothy P.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T03:36:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-19T03:36:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 2012, v. 44, n. 5, p. 459-463-
dc.identifier.issn1499-4046-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222651-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate consumers' understanding of terms commonly used to provide guidance about frequency and quantity of food consumption. Methods: A survey of 405 shoppers explored how frequently consumers thought food labeled with the terms "eat often," "eat moderately," "eat occasionally," "a sometimes food," and "an extra food" should be eaten. In a separate phase, 30 grocery buyers responded to open-ended questions about their interpretation of these terms. Results: Responses indicated significant differences in meaning between the terms. However, the specific interpretation of each term varied considerably across respondents. The qualitative research found the terms to be highly subjective, and there was a high degree of uncertainty about the meaning of the term "an extra food" in particular. Conclusions and Implications: Food frequency and descriptive terms currently used do not provide meaningful or consistent nutritional guidance. There is a need for simple, unambiguous terminology. © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior-
dc.subjectNutrition policy-
dc.subjectFood labeling-
dc.subjectConsumer health information-
dc.titleDo We Provide Meaningful Guidance for Healthful Eating? An Investigation into Consumers' Interpretation of Frequency Consumption Terms-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jneb.2011.12.004-
dc.identifier.pmid22591579-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865958734-
dc.identifier.volume44-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage459-
dc.identifier.epage463-

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