File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The link between dietary glycemic index and nutrient adequacy

TitleThe link between dietary glycemic index and nutrient adequacy
Authors
Issue Date2012
Citation
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2012, v. 95, n. 3, p. 694-702 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Low-glycemic index (low-GI) diets may be less nutritious because of limited food choices. Alternately, high-GI diets could be less healthful because of a higher intake of refined carbohydrate. Objective: The objective was to investigate the association between dietary GI, intakes of carbohydrates from high-GI (CHOhigh GI) and low-GI (CHO low GI) sources, and the risk of nutrient inadequacy in children and adolescents. Design: Children, aged 2-16 y, who provided 2 plausible 24-h recalls in a national survey were included (n = 4140). The ORs of not meeting the Australian Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs) were calculated by logistic regression. Results: Subjects with higher intakes of CHOhigh GI were found to be at risk of not meeting the NRVs for a wide range of nutrients, including calcium and iodine (both P-trend < 0.001). In comparison with subjects in the lowest quartile of CHOhigh GI, those in the highest quartile had 3 times (adjusted OR: 3.13; 95% CI: 2.47, 3.97; P-trend < 0.001) the risk of not meeting the Estimated Average Requirement for calcium. For iodine, the risk increased >5-fold (adjusted OR: 5.45; 95% CI: 3.97, 7.48; P-trend < 0.001). On the other hand, subjects with higher intakes of CHO low GI were less likely to meet Adequate Intakes of unsaturated fatty acids (all P-trend < 0.001), despite having lower risks of not meeting the NRVs for most nutrients. Conclusion: Children and adolescents who consume more CHOlow GIare more likely to meet most nutrient recommendations than those consuming higher GI diets. © 2012 American Society for Nutrition.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222643
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.771

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLouie, Jimmy Chun Yu-
dc.contributor.authorBuyken, Anette E.-
dc.contributor.authorBrand-Miller, Jennie C.-
dc.contributor.authorFlood, Victoria M.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T03:36:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-19T03:36:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2012, v. 95, n. 3, p. 694-702-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222643-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Low-glycemic index (low-GI) diets may be less nutritious because of limited food choices. Alternately, high-GI diets could be less healthful because of a higher intake of refined carbohydrate. Objective: The objective was to investigate the association between dietary GI, intakes of carbohydrates from high-GI (CHOhigh GI) and low-GI (CHO low GI) sources, and the risk of nutrient inadequacy in children and adolescents. Design: Children, aged 2-16 y, who provided 2 plausible 24-h recalls in a national survey were included (n = 4140). The ORs of not meeting the Australian Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs) were calculated by logistic regression. Results: Subjects with higher intakes of CHOhigh GI were found to be at risk of not meeting the NRVs for a wide range of nutrients, including calcium and iodine (both P-trend < 0.001). In comparison with subjects in the lowest quartile of CHOhigh GI, those in the highest quartile had 3 times (adjusted OR: 3.13; 95% CI: 2.47, 3.97; P-trend < 0.001) the risk of not meeting the Estimated Average Requirement for calcium. For iodine, the risk increased >5-fold (adjusted OR: 5.45; 95% CI: 3.97, 7.48; P-trend < 0.001). On the other hand, subjects with higher intakes of CHO low GI were less likely to meet Adequate Intakes of unsaturated fatty acids (all P-trend < 0.001), despite having lower risks of not meeting the NRVs for most nutrients. Conclusion: Children and adolescents who consume more CHOlow GIare more likely to meet most nutrient recommendations than those consuming higher GI diets. © 2012 American Society for Nutrition.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition-
dc.titleThe link between dietary glycemic index and nutrient adequacy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3945/ajcn.111.015271-
dc.identifier.pmid22258270-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857833743-
dc.identifier.volume95-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage694-
dc.identifier.epage702-
dc.identifier.eissn1938-3207-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats