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Article: Reducing job insecurity and increasing performance ratings: Does impression management matter?

TitleReducing job insecurity and increasing performance ratings: Does impression management matter?
Authors
KeywordsJob insecurity
Proactivity
Supervisor liking
Supervisor-attributed motive
Impression management
Issue Date2013
Citation
Journal of Applied Psychology, 2013, v. 98, n. 5, p. 852-862 How to Cite?
AbstractPrior research on job insecurity has demonstrated its detrimental effects on both employees and the organization, yet no research has detailed how people actively deal with it. Drawing from proactivity research, this article argues that job insecurity prompts a proactive use of impression management tactics in the workplace. The effectiveness of these tactics depends on the level of supervisory liking for the employee and the attributions supervisors make regarding the employee's motives for the impression management behaviors (i.e., for the good of the organization or for self-interest). A 3-wave survey study of 271 Chinese employees and their supervisors showed that employees experiencing job insecurity in Time 1 reported using a variety of tactics to impress their supervisors at Time 2 and that these tactics curbed the affect associated with job insecurity and enhanced supervisor rated performance, through supervisor's liking and attributed motives. The relationship between impression management and increased supervisor-rated performance was moderated by supervisor attributions; the relationship between impression management and reduced affective job insecurity depended on supervisor liking. © 2013 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222628
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.81
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.641

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Guo hua-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Helen Hailin-
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Xiong Ying-
dc.contributor.authorAshford, Susan J.-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Cynthia-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T03:36:38Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-19T03:36:38Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Applied Psychology, 2013, v. 98, n. 5, p. 852-862-
dc.identifier.issn0021-9010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222628-
dc.description.abstractPrior research on job insecurity has demonstrated its detrimental effects on both employees and the organization, yet no research has detailed how people actively deal with it. Drawing from proactivity research, this article argues that job insecurity prompts a proactive use of impression management tactics in the workplace. The effectiveness of these tactics depends on the level of supervisory liking for the employee and the attributions supervisors make regarding the employee's motives for the impression management behaviors (i.e., for the good of the organization or for self-interest). A 3-wave survey study of 271 Chinese employees and their supervisors showed that employees experiencing job insecurity in Time 1 reported using a variety of tactics to impress their supervisors at Time 2 and that these tactics curbed the affect associated with job insecurity and enhanced supervisor rated performance, through supervisor's liking and attributed motives. The relationship between impression management and increased supervisor-rated performance was moderated by supervisor attributions; the relationship between impression management and reduced affective job insecurity depended on supervisor liking. © 2013 American Psychological Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Psychology-
dc.rightsThis article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectJob insecurity-
dc.subjectProactivity-
dc.subjectSupervisor liking-
dc.subjectSupervisor-attributed motive-
dc.subjectImpression management-
dc.titleReducing job insecurity and increasing performance ratings: Does impression management matter?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0033151-
dc.identifier.pmid23731028-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84884227126-
dc.identifier.hkuros260096-
dc.identifier.volume98-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage852-
dc.identifier.epage862-

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