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Article: Evolving ecosystems in education: The nature and implications of private supplementary tutoring in Hong Kong

TitleEvolving ecosystems in education: The nature and implications of private supplementary tutoring in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.unesco.org/publications
Citation
Prospects: Quarterly Review of Comparative Education, 2015, v. 45 n. 4, p. 465-481 How to Cite?
AbstractAn established literature draws on ecological concepts to analyse interrelationships within education structures and processes, and the impact of shifting balances. Private supplementary tutoring is a relatively new actor in ecosystems of education around the world. It is creating significant changes in relationships, particularly as they concern the roles of teachers. This paper draws on data from Hong Kong, where private tutoring has become very visible. It presents perspectives on the phenomenon from students and teachers, drawing especially on interview data. It shows that teachers and tutors may sometimes play complementary roles, but that teachers may in some respects be marginalised by the new actors in the ecosystem. Insights from these perspectives suggest a research agenda for other parts of the world as well as for Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222580

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBray, TM-
dc.contributor.authorKOBAKHIDZE, M-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-18T07:43:13Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-18T07:43:13Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationProspects: Quarterly Review of Comparative Education, 2015, v. 45 n. 4, p. 465-481-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222580-
dc.description.abstractAn established literature draws on ecological concepts to analyse interrelationships within education structures and processes, and the impact of shifting balances. Private supplementary tutoring is a relatively new actor in ecosystems of education around the world. It is creating significant changes in relationships, particularly as they concern the roles of teachers. This paper draws on data from Hong Kong, where private tutoring has become very visible. It presents perspectives on the phenomenon from students and teachers, drawing especially on interview data. It shows that teachers and tutors may sometimes play complementary roles, but that teachers may in some respects be marginalised by the new actors in the ecosystem. Insights from these perspectives suggest a research agenda for other parts of the world as well as for Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.unesco.org/publications-
dc.relation.ispartofProspects: Quarterly Review of Comparative Education-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11125-015-9353-2-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleEvolving ecosystems in education: The nature and implications of private supplementary tutoring in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailBray, TM: mbray@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBray, TM=rp00888-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11125-015-9353-2-
dc.identifier.hkuros256822-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage465-
dc.identifier.epage481-
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht-

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