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Article: Exploring Expressive Vocabulary Variability in Two-Year-Olds: The Role of Working Memory

TitleExploring Expressive Vocabulary Variability in Two-Year-Olds: The Role of Working Memory
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/
Citation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2015, v. 58 n. 6, p. 1761-1772 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study explored whether measures of working memory ability contribute to the wide variation in 2-year-olds’ expressive vocabulary skills. Method: Seventy-nine children (aged 24–30 months) were assessed by using standardized tests of vocabulary and visual cognition, a processing speed measure, and behavioral measures of verbal working memory and phonological short-term memory. Results: Strong correlations were observed between phonological short-term memory, verbal working memory, and expressive vocabulary. Speed of spoken word recognition showed a moderate significant correlation with expressive vocabulary. In a multivariate regression model for expressive vocabulary, the most powerful predictor was a measure of phonological short-term memory (accounting for 66% unique variance), followed by verbal working memory (6%), sex (2%), and age (1%). Processing speed did not add significant unique variance. Conclusions: These findings confirm previous research positing a strong role for phonological short-term memory in early expressive vocabulary acquisition. They also extend previous research in two ways. First, a unique association between verbal working memory and expressive vocabulary in 2-year-olds was observed. Second, processing speed was not a unique predictor of variance in expressive vocabulary when included alongside measures of working memory. © 2015 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222578
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNewbury, J-
dc.contributor.authorKlee, T-
dc.contributor.authorStokes, SF-
dc.contributor.authorMoran, C-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-18T07:43:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-18T07:43:09Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2015, v. 58 n. 6, p. 1761-1772-
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222578-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study explored whether measures of working memory ability contribute to the wide variation in 2-year-olds’ expressive vocabulary skills. Method: Seventy-nine children (aged 24–30 months) were assessed by using standardized tests of vocabulary and visual cognition, a processing speed measure, and behavioral measures of verbal working memory and phonological short-term memory. Results: Strong correlations were observed between phonological short-term memory, verbal working memory, and expressive vocabulary. Speed of spoken word recognition showed a moderate significant correlation with expressive vocabulary. In a multivariate regression model for expressive vocabulary, the most powerful predictor was a measure of phonological short-term memory (accounting for 66% unique variance), followed by verbal working memory (6%), sex (2%), and age (1%). Processing speed did not add significant unique variance. Conclusions: These findings confirm previous research positing a strong role for phonological short-term memory in early expressive vocabulary acquisition. They also extend previous research in two ways. First, a unique association between verbal working memory and expressive vocabulary in 2-year-olds was observed. Second, processing speed was not a unique predictor of variance in expressive vocabulary when included alongside measures of working memory. © 2015 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research-
dc.titleExploring Expressive Vocabulary Variability in Two-Year-Olds: The Role of Working Memory-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKlee, TM: tomklee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailStokes, SF: sstokes@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKlee, TM=rp02108-
dc.identifier.authorityStokes, SF=rp02106-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0018-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84953329537-
dc.identifier.hkuros256692-
dc.identifier.volume58-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1761-
dc.identifier.epage1772-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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