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Article: Beyond the two-strategy model of skilled spelling: effects of consistency, grain size, and orthographic redundancy

TitleBeyond the two-strategy model of skilled spelling: effects of consistency, grain size, and orthographic redundancy
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherPsychology Press.
Citation
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Section A: Human Experimental Psychology, 2004, v. 57 n. 2, p. 325-356 How to Cite?
AbstractMost models of spelling assume that people rely on two procedures when engaging in spelling: a lexical look-up procedure that retrieves spellings in their entirety, and a nonlexical procedure that constructs spellings with a set of phoneme-grapheme rules. In the present research, we investigated whether larger sized subsyllabic relationships also play a role in spelling, and how they compare to small-sized phoneme-grapheme relationships. In addition, we investigated whether purely orthographic units can explain some of the variance typically attributed to the mapping between sound and spelling. To do this, we ran five spelling experiments, two using real words and three using nonwords. Results from the experiments showed that there were independent contributions of both phoneme-grapheme and larger sized subsyllabic sound-spelling relationships, although the effect of phoneme-grapheme-sized relationships was always stronger and more reliable than larger sized subsyllabic sound-spelling relationships. Purely orthographic effects were also shown to affect word spelling, but no significant effects were found with nonword spelling. Together, the results support the hypothesis that a major constraint on spelling comes from phoneme-grapheme-sized relationships.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222416
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 2.449
2008 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.803

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPerry, C-
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, JC-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T08:30:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-14T08:30:59Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Section A: Human Experimental Psychology, 2004, v. 57 n. 2, p. 325-356-
dc.identifier.issn0272-4987-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222416-
dc.description.abstractMost models of spelling assume that people rely on two procedures when engaging in spelling: a lexical look-up procedure that retrieves spellings in their entirety, and a nonlexical procedure that constructs spellings with a set of phoneme-grapheme rules. In the present research, we investigated whether larger sized subsyllabic relationships also play a role in spelling, and how they compare to small-sized phoneme-grapheme relationships. In addition, we investigated whether purely orthographic units can explain some of the variance typically attributed to the mapping between sound and spelling. To do this, we ran five spelling experiments, two using real words and three using nonwords. Results from the experiments showed that there were independent contributions of both phoneme-grapheme and larger sized subsyllabic sound-spelling relationships, although the effect of phoneme-grapheme-sized relationships was always stronger and more reliable than larger sized subsyllabic sound-spelling relationships. Purely orthographic effects were also shown to affect word spelling, but no significant effects were found with nonword spelling. Together, the results support the hypothesis that a major constraint on spelling comes from phoneme-grapheme-sized relationships.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPsychology Press. -
dc.relation.ispartofQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Section A: Human Experimental Psychology-
dc.rightsQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Section A: Human Experimental Psychology. Copyright © Psychology Press.-
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.-
dc.subject.meshChoice Behavior-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshPhonetics-
dc.subject.meshVerbal Behavior-
dc.subject.meshVocabulary-
dc.titleBeyond the two-strategy model of skilled spelling: effects of consistency, grain size, and orthographic redundancy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailPerry, C: conrad@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02724980343000323-
dc.identifier.pmid14742179-
dc.identifier.hkuros121263-
dc.identifier.volume57-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage325-
dc.identifier.epage356-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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