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Article: Restless legs symptoms in adolescents: Epidemiology, heritability, and pubertal effects

TitleRestless legs symptoms in adolescents: Epidemiology, heritability, and pubertal effects
Authors
KeywordsHeritability
Pubertal effect
RLS
Adolescents
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 2014, v. 76, n. 2, p. 158-164 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: We aimed to determine the prevalence, pubertal effect, familial aggregation, and heritability of restless legs (RLS) symptoms in Chinese adolescents. In addition, the correlates and consequences of RLS symptoms were examined. Methods: This was a population-based family study that involved 1549 adolescents (probands), their parents and siblings. RLS symptoms were assessed by a single question measuring the core features of RLS. Subjects with RLS symptoms for at least once per week were considered as abnormal. Impairment of daytime functions, behavioral problems, health status, and lifestyle practice were also documented. Results: The prevalence of RLS symptoms was 2.8% in adolescents and 7.4% in their parents with female preponderance. Gender difference of RLS symptoms emerged in mid-pubertal adolescents (Tanner stage 3 or above). RLS symptoms were closely associated with various sleep problems (range of ORs=2.24 to 32.5, p<0.05), except habitual snoring. They were also independently associated with impairment of daytime functions, poor general health and frequent temper outbursts but not caffeine or alcohol intake or cigarette smoking after adjustment for age, sex, and other comorbid sleep problems. RLS symptoms presented with a modest familial aggregation and heritability (h2±SE=0.17±0.04, p<0.001).Interpretation. RLS symptoms are common in Chinese adolescents with significant health repercussions. Puberty plays a critical role in the emergence of gender difference of RLS symptoms, which are accounted for by both genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222152
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.84
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.357

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jihui-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Siu Ping-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shirley Xin-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Albert Martin-
dc.contributor.authorKong, Alice Pik Shan-
dc.contributor.authorWing, Yun Kwok-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T06:48:57Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T06:48:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Psychosomatic Research, 2014, v. 76, n. 2, p. 158-164-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3999-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222152-
dc.description.abstractAims: We aimed to determine the prevalence, pubertal effect, familial aggregation, and heritability of restless legs (RLS) symptoms in Chinese adolescents. In addition, the correlates and consequences of RLS symptoms were examined. Methods: This was a population-based family study that involved 1549 adolescents (probands), their parents and siblings. RLS symptoms were assessed by a single question measuring the core features of RLS. Subjects with RLS symptoms for at least once per week were considered as abnormal. Impairment of daytime functions, behavioral problems, health status, and lifestyle practice were also documented. Results: The prevalence of RLS symptoms was 2.8% in adolescents and 7.4% in their parents with female preponderance. Gender difference of RLS symptoms emerged in mid-pubertal adolescents (Tanner stage 3 or above). RLS symptoms were closely associated with various sleep problems (range of ORs=2.24 to 32.5, p<0.05), except habitual snoring. They were also independently associated with impairment of daytime functions, poor general health and frequent temper outbursts but not caffeine or alcohol intake or cigarette smoking after adjustment for age, sex, and other comorbid sleep problems. RLS symptoms presented with a modest familial aggregation and heritability (h2±SE=0.17±0.04, p<0.001).Interpretation. RLS symptoms are common in Chinese adolescents with significant health repercussions. Puberty plays a critical role in the emergence of gender difference of RLS symptoms, which are accounted for by both genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Psychosomatic Research-
dc.subjectHeritability-
dc.subjectPubertal effect-
dc.subjectRLS-
dc.subjectAdolescents-
dc.titleRestless legs symptoms in adolescents: Epidemiology, heritability, and pubertal effects-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpsychores.2013.11.017-
dc.identifier.pmid24439693-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84892539690-
dc.identifier.volume76-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage158-
dc.identifier.epage164-
dc.identifier.eissn1879-1360-

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