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Article: Frequent nightmares in children: Familial aggregation and associations with parent-reported behavioral and mood problems

TitleFrequent nightmares in children: Familial aggregation and associations with parent-reported behavioral and mood problems
Authors
KeywordsNightmares
Behavioral and mood problems
Children
Familial aggregation
Issue Date2011
Citation
Sleep, 2011, v. 34, n. 4, p. 487-493 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Objectives: To conduct a systematic investigation on the prevalence, correlates, and familial aggregation of frequent nightmares in children, and to scrutinize the associations between frequent nightmares and parent-reported behavioral and mood problems in children. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted by collecting the data on sociodemographic, sleep, behavioral, and family-related information from a total of 6359 children (age: mean [SD] = 9.2 [1.8] years; girls: 49.9%) and their reported biological parents. Setting: Community. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Prevalence of frequent nightmares with a criterion of at least once per week was 5.2%. Multinomial regression analysis indicated that monthly family income, paternal and maternal nightmares, insomnia symptoms, parasomniac symptoms, and daytime consequences were significantly associated with nightmares in children. Frequent nightmares in children were significantly associated with hyperactivity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.68, 95% CI 1.16-2.44), frequent temper outbursts/mood disturbance (OR = 1.76, 95%CI 1.27-2.44), and poor academic performance (OR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.11-2.36), after controlling for potential confounding factors. Approximately 20% of children with frequent night-mares experienced comorbid frequent insomnia. Comorbid nightmares and insomnia were associated with increased odds of hyperactivity (OR = 4.13, 95% CI 2.13-8.00) and frequent temper outbursts/mood disturbance (OR = 2.41, 95%CI 1.27-4.60). Conclusions: Frequent nightmares in children are associated with a constellation of child-, sleep-, and family-related factors, including comorbid sleep problems, such as insomnia and parasomnia, family economic status, and parental predisposition. Frequent nightmares are independently associated with emotional and behavioral problems in children.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222109
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shirley Xin-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Mandy Wai Man-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Siu Ping-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jihui-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Albert Martin-
dc.contributor.authorLai, Kelly Yee Ching-
dc.contributor.authorWing, Yun Kwok-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T06:47:55Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T06:47:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationSleep, 2011, v. 34, n. 4, p. 487-493-
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222109-
dc.description.abstractStudy Objectives: To conduct a systematic investigation on the prevalence, correlates, and familial aggregation of frequent nightmares in children, and to scrutinize the associations between frequent nightmares and parent-reported behavioral and mood problems in children. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted by collecting the data on sociodemographic, sleep, behavioral, and family-related information from a total of 6359 children (age: mean [SD] = 9.2 [1.8] years; girls: 49.9%) and their reported biological parents. Setting: Community. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Prevalence of frequent nightmares with a criterion of at least once per week was 5.2%. Multinomial regression analysis indicated that monthly family income, paternal and maternal nightmares, insomnia symptoms, parasomniac symptoms, and daytime consequences were significantly associated with nightmares in children. Frequent nightmares in children were significantly associated with hyperactivity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.68, 95% CI 1.16-2.44), frequent temper outbursts/mood disturbance (OR = 1.76, 95%CI 1.27-2.44), and poor academic performance (OR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.11-2.36), after controlling for potential confounding factors. Approximately 20% of children with frequent night-mares experienced comorbid frequent insomnia. Comorbid nightmares and insomnia were associated with increased odds of hyperactivity (OR = 4.13, 95% CI 2.13-8.00) and frequent temper outbursts/mood disturbance (OR = 2.41, 95%CI 1.27-4.60). Conclusions: Frequent nightmares in children are associated with a constellation of child-, sleep-, and family-related factors, including comorbid sleep problems, such as insomnia and parasomnia, family economic status, and parental predisposition. Frequent nightmares are independently associated with emotional and behavioral problems in children.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep-
dc.subjectNightmares-
dc.subjectBehavioral and mood problems-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectFamilial aggregation-
dc.titleFrequent nightmares in children: Familial aggregation and associations with parent-reported behavioral and mood problems-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid21461327-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953652809-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage487-
dc.identifier.epage493-
dc.identifier.eissn1550-9109-

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