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Article: Relationship of sleep quantity and quality with 24-hour urinary catecholamines and salivary awakening cortisol in healthy middle-aged adults

TitleRelationship of sleep quantity and quality with 24-hour urinary catecholamines and salivary awakening cortisol in healthy middle-aged adults
Authors
KeywordsCortisol
Sleep quality
Sleep duration
Catecholamines
Actigraphy
Issue Date2011
Citation
Sleep, 2011, v. 34, n. 2, p. 225-233 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: a. Explore the stability in sleep/wake patterns of middle-aged adults over a 3-year follow-up period. b. Explore the relationship between objectively measured sleep indices, urinary catecholamines, and salivary cortisol. Design: Naturalistic follow-up for sleep/wake patterns (n = 114) by 2-week sleep log and cross-sectional design for objective sleep assessments and hormonal measures (n = 96) at follow-up period nearly 3 years after baseline measurements. Setting: Community Participants: Healthy middle-aged adults Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: There were high correlations between baseline and follow-up period (2.6 ± 0.5 years) on sleep/wake patterns (r = 0.6-0.79) as measured by 2-week sleep log. For wave 2 cross-sectional study, objective poor sleepers (3-day actigraphy sleep efficiency < 85%) had a higher 24-h urinary norepinephrine (NE) level (205.7 ± 105 nmol/d vs 162.1 ± 55.6 nmol/d, P = 0.03) and a nearly significantly higher 24-h urinary epinephrine (E) level (P = 0.12) than good sleepers. There were no differences in 3-day mean salivary awakening cortisol and 24-h urinary catecholamines (NE and E) between short and normal/long sleepers. Linear regression results, however, showed that shorter time in bed and actual sleep time, longer sleep onset latency, and lower sleep efficiency were correlated with higher 24-h urinary E and NE (all P < 0.05) but not salivary cortisol. The effect of poor sleep quality on 24-h urinary catecholamines was stronger in males than females. Conclusions: Increased sympathetic activity as measured by 24-h urinary catecholamines might play a critical role in the pathogenesis mediating the relationship of insufficient sleep (quantity and quality) with subsequent cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Salivary awakening cortisol was not associated with sleep quantity and quality in healthy middle-aged adults.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222107
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jihui-
dc.contributor.authorMa, Ronald C W-
dc.contributor.authorKong, Alice P S-
dc.contributor.authorSo, Wing Yee-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Albert M.-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Sui Ping-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shirley Xin-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Mandy W M-
dc.contributor.authorHo, Chung Shun-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Michael H M-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Bin-
dc.contributor.authorWing, Yun Kwok-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T06:47:52Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T06:47:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationSleep, 2011, v. 34, n. 2, p. 225-233-
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222107-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: a. Explore the stability in sleep/wake patterns of middle-aged adults over a 3-year follow-up period. b. Explore the relationship between objectively measured sleep indices, urinary catecholamines, and salivary cortisol. Design: Naturalistic follow-up for sleep/wake patterns (n = 114) by 2-week sleep log and cross-sectional design for objective sleep assessments and hormonal measures (n = 96) at follow-up period nearly 3 years after baseline measurements. Setting: Community Participants: Healthy middle-aged adults Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: There were high correlations between baseline and follow-up period (2.6 ± 0.5 years) on sleep/wake patterns (r = 0.6-0.79) as measured by 2-week sleep log. For wave 2 cross-sectional study, objective poor sleepers (3-day actigraphy sleep efficiency < 85%) had a higher 24-h urinary norepinephrine (NE) level (205.7 ± 105 nmol/d vs 162.1 ± 55.6 nmol/d, P = 0.03) and a nearly significantly higher 24-h urinary epinephrine (E) level (P = 0.12) than good sleepers. There were no differences in 3-day mean salivary awakening cortisol and 24-h urinary catecholamines (NE and E) between short and normal/long sleepers. Linear regression results, however, showed that shorter time in bed and actual sleep time, longer sleep onset latency, and lower sleep efficiency were correlated with higher 24-h urinary E and NE (all P < 0.05) but not salivary cortisol. The effect of poor sleep quality on 24-h urinary catecholamines was stronger in males than females. Conclusions: Increased sympathetic activity as measured by 24-h urinary catecholamines might play a critical role in the pathogenesis mediating the relationship of insufficient sleep (quantity and quality) with subsequent cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Salivary awakening cortisol was not associated with sleep quantity and quality in healthy middle-aged adults.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep-
dc.subjectCortisol-
dc.subjectSleep quality-
dc.subjectSleep duration-
dc.subjectCatecholamines-
dc.subjectActigraphy-
dc.titleRelationship of sleep quantity and quality with 24-hour urinary catecholamines and salivary awakening cortisol in healthy middle-aged adults-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid21286244-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79851500145-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage225-
dc.identifier.epage233-
dc.identifier.eissn1550-9109-

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