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Article: Sleepwalking in psychiatric patients: Comparison of childhood and adult onset

TitleSleepwalking in psychiatric patients: Comparison of childhood and adult onset
Authors
KeywordsPsychiatric patients
Sleepwalking
Sleep-related eating
Adult onset
Issue Date2009
Citation
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2009, v. 43, n. 5, p. 426-430 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: In contrast to the 'benign and self-limiting nature' of childhood sleepwalking, some population and case studies have suggested that adult sleepwalking is more likely to be associated with psychopathology and psychotropic medications. There is a paucity, however, of systematic study in adult psychiatric populations, and the aim of the present study was therefore to compare the impact of psychopathology and medication usage on sleepwalking with reference to age of onset. Methods: Clinical characteristics, sleep symptoms, psychiatric diagnosis and psychotropic usage in 66 childhood- and adult-onset sleepwalkers as identified from a psychiatric clinic, were studied. Results: There was a higher proportion of adult-onset sleepwalking in the psychiatric population. In comparison with childhood-onset sleepwalkers, adult-onset sleepwalkers had higher peak frequency of attacks and a high comorbidity with sleep-related eating features. Factors including frequent insomnia (odds ratio (OR) = 5.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.58-18.40, p = 0.007) and lifetime usage of regular zolpidem (OR = 5.58, 95%CI = 1.65-18.84, p <0.006) were associated with a higher risk of adult-onset sleepwalking. Conclusions: Adult-onset sleepwalking in a psychiatric sample has unique clinical characteristics and specific risk factors. These patients were more likely to present with sleep-related eating features, comorbid insomnia, had and lifetime usage of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics, especially zolpidem. A heightened awareness of the presence of sleepwalking and their associated risk factors among the adult psychiatric population is needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222096
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.269

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Siu Ping-
dc.contributor.authorFong, Samson Yat Yuk-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Mandy Wai Man-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shirley Xin-
dc.contributor.authorWing, Yun Kwok-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T06:47:40Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T06:47:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2009, v. 43, n. 5, p. 426-430-
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222096-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: In contrast to the 'benign and self-limiting nature' of childhood sleepwalking, some population and case studies have suggested that adult sleepwalking is more likely to be associated with psychopathology and psychotropic medications. There is a paucity, however, of systematic study in adult psychiatric populations, and the aim of the present study was therefore to compare the impact of psychopathology and medication usage on sleepwalking with reference to age of onset. Methods: Clinical characteristics, sleep symptoms, psychiatric diagnosis and psychotropic usage in 66 childhood- and adult-onset sleepwalkers as identified from a psychiatric clinic, were studied. Results: There was a higher proportion of adult-onset sleepwalking in the psychiatric population. In comparison with childhood-onset sleepwalkers, adult-onset sleepwalkers had higher peak frequency of attacks and a high comorbidity with sleep-related eating features. Factors including frequent insomnia (odds ratio (OR) = 5.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.58-18.40, p = 0.007) and lifetime usage of regular zolpidem (OR = 5.58, 95%CI = 1.65-18.84, p <0.006) were associated with a higher risk of adult-onset sleepwalking. Conclusions: Adult-onset sleepwalking in a psychiatric sample has unique clinical characteristics and specific risk factors. These patients were more likely to present with sleep-related eating features, comorbid insomnia, had and lifetime usage of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics, especially zolpidem. A heightened awareness of the presence of sleepwalking and their associated risk factors among the adult psychiatric population is needed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry-
dc.subjectPsychiatric patients-
dc.subjectSleepwalking-
dc.subjectSleep-related eating-
dc.subjectAdult onset-
dc.titleSleepwalking in psychiatric patients: Comparison of childhood and adult onset-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00048670902817703-
dc.identifier.pmid19373703-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67651184016-
dc.identifier.volume43-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage426-
dc.identifier.epage430-
dc.identifier.eissn1440-1614-

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