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Book Chapter: On violating one’s own privacy: N-adic utterances and inadvertent disclosures in online venues

TitleOn violating one’s own privacy: N-adic utterances and inadvertent disclosures in online venues
Authors
KeywordsPrivacy
Online disclosure
Interaction
Audiences
Blog
Issue Date2016
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd
Citation
On violating one’s own privacy: N-adic utterances and inadvertent disclosures in online venues. In Robinson, L ... (et al) (Eds.), Communication and Information Technologies Annual: [New] Media Cultures, p. 3-30. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To understand the phenomena of people revealing regrettable information on the Internet, we examine who people think they’re addressing, and what they say, in the process of interacting with those not physically or temporally co-present. Design/methodology/approach: We conduct qualitative analyses of interviews with student bloggers and observations of five years’ worth of their blog posts, drawing on linguists’ concepts of indexical ground and deictics. Based on analyses of how bloggers reference their shared indexical ground and how they use deictics, we expose bloggers’ evolving awareness of their audiences, and the relationship between this awareness and their disclosures. Findings: Over time, writers and their regular audience, or “chorus,” reciprocally reveal personal information. However, since not all audience members reveal themselves in this venue, writers’ disclosures are available to those observers they are not aware of. Thus, their over-disclosure is tied to what we call the “n-adic” organization of online interaction. Specifically, and as can be seen in their linguistic cues, N-adic utterances are directed towards a non-unified audience whose invisibility makes the discloser unable to find out the exact number of participants or the time they enter or exit the interaction. Research implications: Attention to linguistic cues, such as deictics, is a compelling way to identify the shifting reference groups of ethnographic subjects interacting with physically or temporally distant others. Originality/value: We describe the social organization of interaction with undetectable others. N-adic interactions likely also happen in other on- and offline venues in which participants are obscured but can contribute anonymously.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221958
ISBN
Series/Report no.Studies in Media and Communication; v. 11

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTian, X-
dc.contributor.authorMenchik, D-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T05:49:29Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T05:49:29Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationOn violating one’s own privacy: N-adic utterances and inadvertent disclosures in online venues. In Robinson, L ... (et al) (Eds.), Communication and Information Technologies Annual: [New] Media Cultures, p. 3-30. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd, 2016-
dc.identifier.isbn9781785607851-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221958-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To understand the phenomena of people revealing regrettable information on the Internet, we examine who people think they’re addressing, and what they say, in the process of interacting with those not physically or temporally co-present. Design/methodology/approach: We conduct qualitative analyses of interviews with student bloggers and observations of five years’ worth of their blog posts, drawing on linguists’ concepts of indexical ground and deictics. Based on analyses of how bloggers reference their shared indexical ground and how they use deictics, we expose bloggers’ evolving awareness of their audiences, and the relationship between this awareness and their disclosures. Findings: Over time, writers and their regular audience, or “chorus,” reciprocally reveal personal information. However, since not all audience members reveal themselves in this venue, writers’ disclosures are available to those observers they are not aware of. Thus, their over-disclosure is tied to what we call the “n-adic” organization of online interaction. Specifically, and as can be seen in their linguistic cues, N-adic utterances are directed towards a non-unified audience whose invisibility makes the discloser unable to find out the exact number of participants or the time they enter or exit the interaction. Research implications: Attention to linguistic cues, such as deictics, is a compelling way to identify the shifting reference groups of ethnographic subjects interacting with physically or temporally distant others. Originality/value: We describe the social organization of interaction with undetectable others. N-adic interactions likely also happen in other on- and offline venues in which participants are obscured but can contribute anonymously.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd-
dc.relation.ispartofCommunication and Information Technologies Annual: [New] Media Cultures-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStudies in Media and Communication; v. 11-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPrivacy-
dc.subjectOnline disclosure-
dc.subjectInteraction-
dc.subjectAudiences-
dc.subjectBlog-
dc.titleOn violating one’s own privacy: N-adic utterances and inadvertent disclosures in online venues-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailTian, X: xltian@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, X=rp01543-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/S2050-206020160000011001-
dc.identifier.hkuros256477-
dc.identifier.spage3-
dc.identifier.epage30-
dc.publisher.placeBingley, UK-

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